December 17, 2020, by Brigitte Nerlich

Covid anthropology

This is just a quick announcement about an open access triple set of special issues of Anthropology in Action about the new coronavirus and the ways we live now, published by Berghahn, London:

“Almost one year into the pandemic the ‘no-touch’ world of COVID-19 is transforming our intimate lives, perhaps permanently in many ways. Edited by Andrew Dawson (University of Melbourne) and Simone Dennis (Australian National University) and comprising forty-nine articles by sixty-nine contributors about twenty-three countries across Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America and Oceania, this triple special issue set of Anthropology in Action explores COVID-19 and the Transformation of Intimacy.

Intimacies at all scales are are considered, from humans’ relationships with microbes through to those with deities, and, in between the intimate lives of lovers, family members, friends, co-workers, students, teachers and researchers, citizens and states, and nations. The set comprises a mix of short articles (minimum 2500-words) and feature articles (maximum 9000-words) such as those by Michael Herzfeld, Hazel Andrews, Kelly Colas, Ela Drazkiewicz, Deane Fergie et al, Rebecca Irons, Pooja Satyogi, and Genevieve Bell. Some reflect on and from conditions of lockdown, and many are ethnographic, including several ‘frontline’ ethnographies by anthropologists working as medics or being treated as patients on COVID-19 wards.”

Volume 27, Issue 2:

COVID-19 and the Transformation of Intimacy: Microbes – Bodies

Volume 27, Issue 3:

COVID-19 and the Transformation of Intimacy: Lovers – Deities

Volume 28, Issue 1:

COVID-19 and the Transformation of Intimacy Microbes – Workers

 

Carmen McLeod, Eleonor Hadley Kershaw and I have something in Microbes – Bodies

Fearful Intimacies

COVID-19 and the Reshaping of Human–Microbial Relations

By: Carmen McLeodEleanor Hadley Kershaw, and Brigitte Nerlich

Pages: 33–39

Image: Pixy: Microbes Seamless Pattern N2

Posted in anthropology