Immunohistochemistry in Neuroscience

By Emma Gow, 3rd Year Neuroscience BSc Neuroscience is a complex and ever-growing field of science, requiring constant research to understand how the brain functions. We will never completely understand every aspect of the brain, but there is a great effort from the scientific community to expand our knowledge of such a complex but fascinating subject. …

New research from the School of Life Sciences shows promise in the fight against cognitive decline

By Emma Gow, 3rd Year Neuroscience BSc Cognition is the combination of many mental processes that lead to the acquisition of knowledge or understanding. This can include the functions of conceptual understanding, reasoning, written and verbal communication, problem solving, memory, attention, and participation in the community [1]. Cognitive functions are obviously very important in everyday …

Myelin: An unknown saviour for the brain

By Sakaorna Jeyanathan  During my final year of my degree in neuroscience, I have delved into the function of myelin in a lot of detail1. Myelin is an important membrane structure of the brain which is made from fats and acts as an insulating and protective layer for neurones2. It also increases the speed of …

Physical exercise improves mental health disorders: stigma or advances?

Written by María Ángeles Jiménez Sigstad Nowadays, is a common knowledge that exercise has an impact on mental health. Most researchers suggest that it is a positive one rather than negative. However, autistic people and individuals with an introvert personality could potentially feel pressured by this knowledge. They could be socially rejected by their peers …

Computational Neuroscience: GPCRs and Bioinformatics

In Conversation with Professor Dmitry Veprintsev Written by María Ángeles Jiménez Sigstad G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins which are highly relevant due to a large number of drugs that activate them. The classical mechanism of activation of GPCRs is comprised by the binding of agonists, a type of ligand or drug, leading to …

How bad is air pollution for our brain?

Written by Sakaorna Jeyanathan Nobody can deny that we are globally subjected to air pollution on a daily basis. Although it may not be as drastic as the pollution in China(1), we have unknowingly become accustomed to the fumes produced by cars, factories and agriculture(2). Presumably, this can have severe implications on our respiratory system …

Altered gene expression in neurotransmitter pathways observed in Schizophrenia

Written by Vaishali Gursal (3rd year BSc Neuroscience)   Schizophrenia is a severe, long-term debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder whereby an individual is unable to separate their own thoughts from reality. The exact causes of schizophrenia are unknown, although environmental and genetic factors combined can enable susceptibility to trigger the condition. Positive and negative symptoms of the …

New mechanism for the spreading of pain in inflammatory arthritis

Written by Lucy Tyler   As the home of the Arthritis Research UK Pain Centre, much of the research conducted at the University of Nottingham’s School of Life Sciences in the Queen’s Medical Centre, is based on chronic pain and how it can be treated more effectively. Arthritis is an umbrella term for disorders of …

Are Plant-based Diets Good for the Brain?

Written by Vaishali Gursal (3rd year BSc Neuroscience)   Earlier this month, a study by the University of Oxford concluded that a global switch to a plant-based diet (rich in fruits and vegetables, along with a heavily decreased consumption of red and processed meat) could cut greenhouse gas emissions by two-thirds, reduce global expenditure on …