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Profile: Jean-Luc Mélenchon, the far-left candidate shaking up the French election

Dr Paul Smith, Associate Professor in French and Francophone Studies writes for The Conversation about the far-left candidate shaking up the French election. The French call it Mélenchonite, a feverish excitement brought on by over-exposure to left-wing populism. There was an outbreak of it during the country’s 2012 presidential campaign, when, just a fortnight before the …

Nottingham academic works with the British Army

An Assistant Professor from the School of Politics and International Relations, Dr Louise Kettle, recently spent time based in Warminster conducting research and working with the British Army. The prestigious one month placement was organised in conjunction with The Whitehall & Industry Group – a charity which aims to bring together business, government and the …

APRIL 4: THE REAL KING DAY

Peter Ling, Professor of American Studies at The University of Nottingham, and author of the 2015 Martin Luther King biography, looks at the anniversary of Martin Luther King’s Riverside Address 50 years ago. April 4 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s Riverside address, his outspoken denunciation of US policy in Vietnam. A …

A hologram, a family scandal and a man on the march: the French election just got really exciting

Paul Smith, Associate Professor in French and Francophone studies, writes for The Conversation Embattled presidential candidate François Fillon probably looked at the political calendar in the first week of February and thanked his lucky stars that the spotlight shifted, for a weekend at least, to other candidates in the French election race. Lyon became the …

Guy Fawkes night: celebrating the most famous act of counter-terrorism in history

Dr Louise Kettle from the School of Politics and International Relations writes for The Conversation about one of the most famous terrorists of all time… ‘With the terrorism threat level remaining at “severe” (meaning an attack is highly likely), and the head of MI5, Andrew Parker, warning that “there will be terrorist attacks” in Britain, there is a climate …

Brexit: Europe’s new nationalism is here to stay

Simon Toubeau, Assistant Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations, discusses Brexit in an article for The Conversation: It is something of a tragic irony that the European Union – originally constructed to lay to rest the atavistic nationalist impulses of the 20th century – is today behind the resurgence of such feelings …

Should we stay or should we go – Experts debate ‘Brexit’ at a public debate

I’m not sure about anyone else, but as much as I hear about the EU referendum – I still couldn’t give you strong points from both sides of the argument about whether Britain should stay or go. So when I found out that the Faculty of Social Sciences were going to hold a debate, I thought this …

Panama Papers: why we’re looking at global corruption the wrong way

By Professor Paul Heywood from The School of Politics – writing for The Conversation Although the size and scale of the Panama Papers leak was shocking, the offshore dealing they revealed was hardly a surprise. After all, many organisations, including Transparency International, Global Witness, Action Aid, Christian Aid, Corruption Watch, and Tax Justice Network have …

The UK’s approach to tackling corruption overseas examined by Nottingham expert

Paul Heywood, Sir Francis Hill Professor of European Politics at The University of Nottingham, has given evidence at the International Development Committee’s tackling corruption overseas inquiry. Professor Heywood is leading the British Academy/DFID Anti-corruption Evidence (ACE) partnership, a £3.6 million initiative to support leading international research teams to research and identify the most successful ways …

Anti-corruption scheme led by Nottingham academic announces major projects

The British Academy has announced eight projects it will fund as part of its £4 million global anti-corruption research scheme, which is led by Paul Heywood, Professor  of European Politics here at Nottingham. The scheme provides  support for eight outstanding research teams, whose work will focus primarily on DFID priority countries where corruption is a major …