Addressing the Eczema PSP priorities with citizen science

In 2011, the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology (CEBD) at the University of Nottingham worked with the James Lind Alliance to run an Eczema Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) exercise. The aim was to identify and prioritise uncertainties around how best to treat and manage eczema. Over 500 individuals took part. The exercise identified 14 priority …

Boosting study recruitment by engaging with Be Part of Research

We were all so excited when the Eczema Bathing Study opened to recruitment on 29 January. It’s the first study to come out of the Rapid Eczema Trials research programme and is trying to find out whether it’s better to have a shower (or bath) daily or just once or twice a week when you have …

Eczema Care Online – one year on…

It’s now been over a year since we first launched the Eczema Care Online website. We thought it was time we gave you an update on how things are going. The Eczema Care Online website has been accessed by over 20,000 people from 157 countries around the world. This is an amazing achievement, but with …

Rapid Eczema Trials: Life of an intern

The Rapid Eczema Trials project involves researchers, healthcare professionals and citizen scientists (people with eczema and parents of children with eczema) working together to answer important questions about eczema by designing and running clinical trials together.  Being an intern at the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology (CEBD) is an opportunity that has changed the trajectory …

A new adventure: designing eczema research as a citizen scientist.

The RAPID Eczema Trials team involves researchers, healthcare professionals and citizen scientists (people with eczema and parents of children with eczema) working together to answer important questions about eczema by designing and running clinical trials together. Our citizen scientist Kelly Zhang has shared her experience of being involved… Months ago, I was kindly invited to …

We all bathe differently

The RAPID Eczema Trials team involves researchers, healthcare professionals and citizen scientists (people with eczema and parents of children with eczema) working together to answer important questions about eczema by designing and running clinical trials together. The first question we are answering is about bathing, so our citizen scientist Tressa Davey has been looking into …

50 at 50: PRIMIS – Transforming primary care data 

Alongside the celebrations for the 50th anniversary of the School of Medicine, a small but important team within the School is celebrating a significant birthday itself in 2020.  Over the past 20 years PRIMIS has become the leader in extracting knowledge and value from primary care data, helping to achieve better health outcomes across the UK.  The PRIMIS team produces highly effective and …

My BMedSci research experience: a peek into academia

It was Friday afternoon, on a turbulent 45-minute bus ride from Derby to Nottingham…whilst my friend complained about motion sickness from the perilous swerves, I exclaimed with unintended passion “now imagine the neonates!” That awkward split-second was when it dawned upon me: my BMedSci* Honours Year research project, in Academic Child Health in the School …

BMedSci project: “A vision for the future of gross anatomy teaching at medical school”

There were a few central reasons why I chose to study Medicine at the University of Nottingham. The opportunity to obtain two degrees during the 5-year course, and the medical school’s teaching of Gross Anatomy through full-cadaver dissection classes, set Nottingham apart. To conclude my BMedSci degree, and the first half of my course, I …

Third year of medical school

My name is Hayley and I’m a fourth-year medical student. So, third year is quite a drastic change compared to the first two years at Nottingham- you’re no longer stuck in the lecture theatres! Third year is essentially split into two halves, the first half (September- February) is working on your BMedSci project; the second …