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50 at 50: Transforming healthcare: High explosive treatment for treatment of stroke

I have been in Nottingham since 1998 having previously been a Clinical Lecturer then Senior Lecturer in South-West then South-East London. My research and clinical interest in nitric oxide, a gas comprising a molecule of just one oxygen and nitrogen atom, started when working for my MD postgraduate research degree at the “University of Beckenham”, …

50 at 50: Tamra’s Notes

Starting Medical School I was nervous about the concept of full body dissection. I had shown preference for it across the board in my application, but without any real understanding of what it would mean to me to be in a room full of cadavers.  In year one I struggled with the sheer volume of work and attention to detail that Anatomy demanded. …

50 at 50: Covid-19: Looking after your mental health

Modern medicine is growing exponentially and has consistently showcased how we are becoming capable of combating both mental and physical health. In a vocation where irregularities are persistent and intense challenges become the norm, I think I speak for us all when I say that no one could have predicted the devasting impact COVID-19 has had …

50 at 50: Developing as an Early Career Researcher

I took a relatively untraditional journey to the University of Nottingham’s School of Medicine. Starting with an undergraduate degree in Musicology, I shifted to Psychology for my PhD, and when the opportunity arose to move to Nottingham’s Hearing Sciences department a few years later, I jumped at the chance. My interests have always centred on …

50 at 50: The experience of undertaking CP1 during the Covid-19 pandemic

Clinical placement is a time for us medical students to put into practice all of the skills and academic knowledge we have learnt to date. Additionally, it is a time to realise that when you’re asked a question when you first start on the wards, no matter how simple it is, your mind will go …

50 at 50: The Dean’s Symposium: Transformative inclusion: The future of healthcare

Celebrations of 50 years of Medicine and 30 years of Nursing at Nottingham are in full swing. The Dean’s Symposium on Transformative Inclusion was held on the 28 April and it was a fitting part of these events.  The programme included three speakers talking about three very different but thought–provoking subjects.     The virtual event began with a warm welcome from Professor Brigitte Scammell, Dean of Medicine and Head of School to …

50 at 50: Transforming health care of older people

I’ve been in Nottingham for 30 years, and was in touching distance of those who were there at the start of Nottingham medical school. I find it astonishing to reflect on the transformation I witnessed or heard about first hand. I am told that one of the reason for the medical school was the awful …

50 at 50: UoN First Responders Milestone Achievement

An initiative set up in 2014, the University of Nottingham First Responders is a scheme consisting predominantly of medical students, some of whom continue responding in their F1 year. We volunteer to support East Midlands Ambulance Service (EMAS) in responding to high-level emergency calls, including cardiac arrests, seizures, and paediatric patients. Our scheme is very …

50 at 50: Reflections on my time at Nottingham Medical School: Achieving excellence in primary care and applied health research

My first memory of Nottingham Medical School was attending for interview for a medical school place in 1980. To my mind Nottingham had the most exciting progressive course in the country, and I particularly liked the emphasis on medicine in the community. At interview Professor Richard Madeley asked what I would do if I had …

50 at 50: Graduate Entry Medicine, A Different Kind of Freedom

Medicine was almost a spur of the moment choice for me, I don’t quite want to say an epiphany. I hadn’t given it any thought at all until I virtually stumbled across the concept of Graduate Entry Medicine during a rather drawn out period of soul- and job searching in my late twenties. I still …