2020 Health Humanities Conference – ‘Health and Our Environment’

Some readers may be interested to know about an upcoming one-day conference being held at Nottingham on March 23, co-organised by the two PhD students attached to the Nightingale Comes Home project, Mathilde Vialard and Frances Cadd, along with their colleague from English, Emma Putland. The conference is on the theme of ‘Health and Our …

Florence Nightingale, Yorkshire, and All That

A couple of event notifications have come our way courtesy of John Bibby, of the University of York: John writes: “Readers of the Nightingale blog may be interested to learn about two upcoming conferences, each with social history themes with focus on the Victorian period and its relevance for today. On February 28th, Radical Statistics …

Margaret Povey, Nightingale’s Nearest Living Relative – and Nightingale Nurse

Richard and Paul from the project team recently travelled to meet Florence Nightingale’s nearest living relative, Margaret Povey, in a meeting kindly arranged by friend of the project, John Rivers.  Margaret – the granddaughter of Nightingale’s cousin, General Sir Lothian Nicholson – also possesses an original letter from Nightingale to her uncle George Nicholson, which …

New workshop – ‘The Home in Modern History and Culture’ – 27 Jan 2020

The project team is pleased to be able to confirm the date of Monday 27 January 2020 for our second academic workshop, to be held at the University of Nottingham, Council Room, Trent Building. This workshop, the second in our series of three, explores the theme of Home and its applicability as a prism through …

Finding Florence Nightingale Across the Atlantic – by Steph Meek

Steph Meek, an AHRC-funded PhD Researcher at the Universities of Exeter and Reading, recently discovered two previously unknown letters by Florence Nightingale during a research visit to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In the post below Steph explains how the letters shed light on the Victorian lending libraries to which Nightingale subscribed on behalf …

In Pursuit of Nightingale – by Katharine McMahon

Katharine McMahon is the latest guest contributor to our blog. Katharine’s novel The Rose of Sebastopol follows a thwarted disciple of Nightingale, Rosa, through her trials in the Crimea. It was selected for the Richard & Judy Book Club in 2008 and went on to become an international bestseller.  In this post, Katharine recalls her …

Periodic Wallpaper

Our project is featured in the latest issue of the University of Nottingham magazine Vision, which marks the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table of Elements. It was Nottingham’s Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff that helped inspire the worldwide recognition of this landmark in the history of science. The issue features a range of projects from …

The First BME Nurse in the NHS – by Professor Lynn McDonald

In our latest guest blog, Professor Lynn McDonald, editor of the Collected Works of Florence Nightingale and co-founder of the Nightingale Society, outlines the little-known story of Kofoworola Abeni Pratt, the first black nurse to work in the NHS. Mrs “Rola” Pratt was an outstanding nursing leader. When the Windrush Empire arrived in the U.K. in …

‘We’re in an incredibly privileged position, to be able to care for people’ – interview with Sir Stephen Moss

Sir Stephen Moss is a nurse who has had a distinguished career in NHS management. He spent seven years as Director of Nursing at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary before moving to the Queens Medical Centre in Nottingham in 1984, where he worked for 20 years. He also worked as a Commissioner on the first NHS …

Nightingale and big data – BBC video

Just thought I would share this BBC video from last week on Florence Nightingale and Big Data. It does a good job of highlighting Nightingale’s passionate interest in statistics and evidence-based policy making. The video might also have mentioned that Nightingale went out of her way to generate data where none existed for her to …