// Archives

My time in Madagascar working with Operation Wallacea

A blog by Dr Joe Bailey I recently returned from my fourth field season in Madagascar working with Operation Wallacea. We work in the dry forest in the north-west, during the dry season (it’s dry). My role out there is as a landscape ecologist (e.g. how might species and overall biodiversity be affected by edge …

The 17th International Conference of Historical Geographers in Warsaw, July 2018

A blog by Pietro Piana The 17th International Conference of Historical Geographers took place in Warsaw between 15 and 20 July 2018. The conference, which is organised every three years, is the most important event for historical geographers, and this year there were 106 thematic sessions, 4 key speakers and 365 papers and by participants …

The 14th International Paleolimnology Association (IPA) Conference, Stockholm (18-21 June 2018)

A blog by Dr Ginnie Panizzo, Dr George Swann, Professor Sarah Metcalfe and Dr Matt Jones This year saw the first ever joint meeting held between the IPA and the International Association of Limnogeology  (IAL) in Stockholm, Sweden. The conference proved a great collaborative success between the two organisations, with over 400 delegates attending. The …

Science Group mapping a new future for Attenborough Nature Reserve

Professor Suzanne McGowan reports on the first meeting of the Attenborough Science task group Attenborough Nature Reserve is facing some important changes. Located between Beeston and Chilwell, and in the confluence of the Trent and Erewash Rivers, the reserve is an immensely popular site for local recreational and nature activities. The reserve is designated a …

Race, ‘resilience’, and resistance: reflections on the AAG 2018

A blog by Dr Nick Clare There is no such thing as a natural disaster. When visiting New Orleans it is impossible not to be confronted by this. As Dr David Beckingham outlined in his blog critical, historical reflection is required to understand the contemporary city; a city shaped by complex histories of colonialism and …

AAG Conference, New Orleans 2018: Geography and its Constitutive Outsides

A blog by Dr Shaun French What does it mean to be an academic geographer?  What is the nature of academic labour?  What responsibilities do geographers have to their students, to their colleagues, to their discipline, to their school and department, their institution and employer, to their local communities, to research and the researched, to …

When Politics and Conferences Align

A blog by Dr Cordelia Freeman In May 2018 I was lucky to travel over to the Republic of Ireland for the Conference of Irish Geographers being held at Maynooth University. This was the first time I had attended the conference and I was drawn to attend due to a call for papers on geography …

New Orleans: The city and the swamp

In April Dr David Beckingham travelled to the American Association of Geographers (AAG) Conference in New Orleans. The conference last visited NOLA in 2004, just over a year before Hurricane Katrina battered the Mississippi delta. Here he reflects on thinking historically about the city. Colonial foundations Pinched between Lake Pontchartrain and the mighty Mississippi river, …

How do you make an impact in Hanoi?

Professor Suzanne McGowan reports on her recent trip to Vietnam and Malaysia Academics are now increasingly required to ensure that their research has an ‘impact’. Research that has an impact is defined by NERC as having led to “demonstrable social, cultural, public policy or service, health, environmental or quality of life benefits”. But what does …

European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2018

A blog by Dr Matt Johnson Between Wednesday 11th and Friday 13th April I attended the European Geosciences Union General Assembly which took place in Vienna. The EGU is one of the largest environmental conferences in the World, with 15,075 scientists from over 106 countries attending in 2018. The conference covers a wonderfully diverse programme, …