// Latest Posts

European Society for Environmental History conference 2019

A blog by Dr Robert Hearn From the 21st to the 25th August, I attended the 10th biennial conference of the European Society for Environmental History (ESEH), hosted by the Estonian Centre for Environmental History (KAJAK) at Tallinn University. Celebrating the society’s 20th anniversary, this year’s conference explored the theme of ‘Boundaries in/of Environmental History’. …

Mt St. Helens Field-course 2019 Student Perspective

A blog by Charlotte Evans The Mt St Helens 1980 eruption is a hard case-study to avoid as a Geography student. It tends to re-occur throughout GCSE and A-Level studies, and I have always been fascinated by it. When the opportunity presented itself to visit the volcano and study the surrounding landscape, I knew I …

ISRS2019 in Vienna, Austria

A blog by Alexandra Zieritz About 8 months ago (how time flies…) I started my Anne McLaren Fellowship at Nottingham UK after having spent four years at the Malaysia Campus. During that period, my focus was on developing networks and disseminating my work in Malaysia and the wider Southeast Asian region. As one of my …

BP prize winners

A blog by Matt Jones School of Geography alumnus Josh Townsend visited Nottingham last week to present our first BP Environmental Geoscience prizes. These awards are made to our undergraduate Environmental Geoscience students based on their dissertation proposals and provide funds to help them with their dissertation fieldwork undertaken over the summer vacation. This year …

The Goldschmidt conference

A blog by Professor George Swann Why do you go to a conference? One of the most common questions I’m asked when I mention that I about to head off to such an event. Some might simply see a conference as a glorified holiday. Whilst conferences can indeed be an opportunity to travel somewhere new, …

Bird diversity and mining

Lucy Benniston writes about her undergraduate dissertation research… After months of searching through old maps, emailing landowners and researching local history, in August I finally had a list of woodland sites I would be able to sample. For my dissertation research I would be visiting 15 different woodlands in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire to record the …

Topographical art, landscape history and current landscape management policies in NW Italy

A blog by Professor Charles Watkins The coast and mountainous interior of North West Italy were popular with British tourists and travellers in the nineteenth century. The number of visitors rapidly increased after the defeat of Napoleon in 1815 and from 1835 onwards more and more of these people settled along the coast. Many visitors …

Map of the month. Pakistan, India and mapping the contested accession of South Asia’s princely states

A blog by Philip Jagessar Earlier this year the government of India controversially revoked article 370 of the constitution which had given the long disputed state of Jammu and Kashmir a degree of autonomy from the rest of India. Pakistan loudly protested this unilateral move by India and rising tensions have revived fears of a …

The 2019 Mount St Helens field course – a staff perspective

A blog by Stephen Dugdale In early September 2019, 15 students from the School of Geography, accompanied by Prof Colin Thorne, Dr Steve Dugdale, Dr Liam Clark and PhD candidate Hazel Wilson, travelled to the US state of Washington to learn about the ongoing impacts of the eruption of Mount St Helens. Now in its …

Attending the IMGS in New Zealand’s South Island

A blog by Alastair Munro, PhD researcher in the School of Geography Earlier this summer, I was fortunate enough to attend the 18th International Medical Geography Symposium (IMGS), 30th June – 5th July, in New Zealand. For me, the trip was one of several firsts; my first long-haul flight eastwards, first-time setting foot in the …