// Archives

Why some drugs don’t work for pain

This blog has been written by Associate Professor Roger Knaggs.  He has been instrumental in the development of PAIN (Pharmacist Analgesia Interest Network) and he is chair of the United Kingdom Clinical Pharmacy Association’s Pain Management Group. Following co-option to the British Pain Society Council for several years, he became the first Pharmacist to become an elected …

Plenty of Prizes for our Marie Curie research fellow

In 2014, Dr Adam Celiz was awarded a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship (IOF) to build his own research program at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University with Professor David Mooney.  This included a return phase to work in the School with Professor Morgan Alexander. His current research is focused on …

Pharmacy Research Blog Nov 2016 – Jan 2017

Welcome to our research blog, bringing you highlights from the latest edition of the School of Pharmacy Journal, a quarterly collection of publications and press releases. The images below represent the design and synthesis of nucleotide monophosphate mimetic eIF4E inhibitors, which are discussed in the following recent publication: Design of nucleotide-mimetic and non-nucleotide inhibitors of the translation …

Pharmacy Research Blog August-October 2016

Welcome to our latest edition of the School of Pharmacy Journal and Newsletter, a collection of publications and press releases from August to October 2016. (follow the link to see the full publication). These three months have seen the School has continue to progress the broad spectrum of research in pharmaceutical science, and make a …

Pharmacy Research Blog May-July 2016

Welcome to the latest edition of our School of Pharmacy Journal and Newsletter, a quarterly collection of publications and press releases from May to July 2016 (follow the link above to see the full publication). Researchers in the School continue to pave the way to tackle the healthcare challenges of the present and future. The advent of …

What is the political driver behind future pharmacy service provision and what can we learn from what has already been done?

This blog has been written by Robert Oakley, one of our third year undergraduate students. It is the fourth of four posts about his experience in attending a King’s Fund conference in February 2016 on “Commissioning person-centred care for vulnerable groups: what role does pharmacy play?”. So now we are aware of some exciting new …

Case study on care home residents – why are pharmacists needed in care homes and how can better healthcare be delivered to members within this vulnerable group?

This blog has been written by Robert Oakley, one of our third year undergraduate students. It is the third of four posts about his experience in attending a King’s Fund conference in February 2016 on “Commissioning person-centred care for vulnerable groups: what role does pharmacy play?”. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that the aging population …

What does community pharmacy environment in the UK look like and how as a pharmacist can you drive innovation and change?

This blog has been written by Robert Oakley, one of our third year undergraduate students. It is the second of four posts about his experience in attending a King’s Fund conference in February 2016 on “Commissioning person-centred care for vulnerable groups: what role does pharmacy play?”.     The current scenario of pharmacy’s input to vulnerable …

The King’s Fund Conference, February 2016

This blog has been written by Robert Oakley, one of our third year undergraduate students. it is the first of four posts about his experience in attending a King’s Fund conference in February 2016 on “Commissioning person-centred care for vulnerable groups: what role does pharmacy play?”. Hi, my name is Rob and I am an …

Joy Wingfield’s blog for International Women’s Day 2016

I rarely think of myself as a scientist. That’s because popular images of scientists in my youth used to be wild-eyed souls in white coats and goggles surrounded by bubbling retorts and bunsen burners. The equipment has modernised: micro-assays and computers now but the media still represents scientists as lab-workers finding the inevitable medical breakthrough …