Eye Movements in Choice

They say the eyes are the window to the soul. Here at NIBS we’ve been using the eyes – or at least the way people move their eyes – as a route to understanding what happens when people make decisions.  We invited people to the laboratory and recorded their eye movements.  We worked on people …

Choosing when to choose (and when not to)

Whilst it is crucial to understand what people choose and why, we also want to understand why people come to a decision at a particular time, or after a certain amount of deliberation. When we are trying to understand these questions behavioural scientists tend to run experiments that ask individuals to choose between a number …

The Strangeness of Tradition

In case you missed it, it’s well worth listening again to this episode of the Human Zoo (series 7), first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on 22 December 2015.  Hear NIBS Co-Investigator’s Nick Chater (University of Warwick) and Bob Sugden (University of East Anglia) talk about “The Strangeness of Tradition“. Christmas is the time of year …

Warwick Business School – Second Nudgeathon

On the 14th and 15th of September 2015, the second Nudgeathon, a behavioural change competition founded by the Warwick Business School, will take place at The Shard in London. Nudgeathon, as its name implies, is a nudging marathon. The main objective of the event is to develop implementable solutions to a given social issue. The idea …

Intertemporal Choice Workshop

Forty scholars from across the NIBS network and further afield met in Warwick to generate and discuss ideas related to intertemporal choice. Organised by the Intertemporal Choice mini-network in NIBS, the conference was set up to foster collaboration between researchers from different institutions, and to promote policy-focused research ideas tackling the issues related to choice …

Two new papers on ‘virtual bargaining’ as a foundation for social interaction, culture, and society

In social interactions people often act jointly: they take turns in conversations, coordinate their actions in rowing, football or improvised dance, perform complementary tasks in cooking, assembling furniture, or, perhaps, even in elementary economic transactions. But how do such joint actions work? And how, in particular, do people successfully coordinate with each other, without explicit …

Sudeep Bhatia on Sequential sampling and paradoxes of risky choice

    Sudeep Bhatia, NIBS Research Fellow at the University of Warwick, recently published ‘Sequential sampling and paradoxes of risky choice‘ in the Psychonomic Bulletin & Review (June 2014). Abstract: The common-ratio, common-consequence, reflection, and event-splitting effects are some of the best-known findings in decision-making research. They represent robust violations of expected utility theory, and …