// Archives

The new year’s resolution fitness drive: a road to nowhere?

It’s January, when thoughts turn to the year ahead and the inevitable resolutions. In our New Year, New You blog series, guest bloggers from around the university will offer advice on what we should – and shouldn’t – do to be successful in our quest to a happier and healthier 2017 and beyond. In the first …

Unlocking the chemical memory of ancient bones

As Halloween approaches and the shops begin to fill with stereotypical collections of plastic skeletons, researchers at the University of Nottingham are turning their attention to a collection of real bones dating back to medieval times. In recent years at the largest monastic excavation in Europe, Norton Priory in Runcorn, more than 130 skeletons from the …

Praise for new national children’s brain tumour initiative

Cancer experts at the University have welcomed a new national initiative aimed at raising awareness of children’s brain tumours. The Royal College for General Practitioners (RCGP) has announced ‘Brain Tumours in Children’ as a new clinical special project which will run from 2016 until 2017. The overall aims of this project are to educate primary …

Walking the Robin Hood Way to help detect breast cancer early

As the University’s Life Cycle 6 team recovers from 170 miles in the saddle to warm up for the main event in August, Denise Kendrick, Professor of Primary Care Research in the School of Medicine, is about to put on her walking boots and gearing up for her own gruelling challenge to support the charitable …

Plaudits for dementia care documentary

A documentary commissioned to complement University of Nottingham research into hospital care for people with dementia has picked up two prizes at the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival. Today is Monday was commissioned and produced by Pippa Foster (now Operations Manager, Alzheimer’s Society) while she was working at The University of Nottingham with …

Robot in the classroom?

With a new generation of digital natives in the classroom, IT in schools is now as commonplace as textbooks and PE kits. But could there be a more radical use for computer technology that could assist in teaching children with profound and multiple disabilities? Researchers at Nottingham have been investigating the use of a humanoid …