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Chinese New Year celebrations raise more than £3,000 for the Nottingham Breast Cancer Research Centre

A programme of Chinese New Year celebrations has raised more than £3,000 for the Nottingham Breast Cancer Research Centre. The Year of the Pig was celebrated with activities delivered by the Nottingham Confucius Institute and Lakeside Arts.   Nottingham Confucius Institute teachers and student volunteers ran community arts and crafts activities at the Angear Visitor Centre. And …

Penguins and poorly rabbits win the day at charity bake off

Students and staff from the University of Nottingham swapped their lab coats for aprons and rose to the annual charity bake off challenge this week, producing a variety of unusual and creative cakes with an animal theme. The popular competition is in it’s 7thyear and is organised by students based on Sutton Bonington campus. It …

Professor Yuri Oganessian celebrates year of periodic table with Nottingham visit

Professor Yuri Oganessian, esteemed nuclear physicist and the only living person to have an element named after him gave the Sir Jesse Boot Foundation lecture to a packed audience to help celebrate the 150th year of the Periodic Table. As well as giving the lecture which covered some of Yuri’s world-leading research into superheavy chemical …

Celebrating Inspirational Women

This year we launched our Inspirational Women social media campaign. Staff and students were invited to nominate female colleagues in Nottingham and our campuses in China and Malaysia, by explaining their inspirational contribution to the University. Almost 150 submissions were received celebrating women at all levels and job types. Each day throughout the March three …

Women scientists are here and we’re fiercer than ever

By Dr Rebecca Dewey, Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham.  We’re experiencing a nouvelle vague of intelligent, prominent women in the media, and the existence of events like International Women’s Day are the icing on the cake. Whether or not you’ve been aware of discussions in the media around Angela Saini’s Inferior campaign and …

Undergraduates join the fight against malaria with new drug discovery programme.

The University of Nottingham has embarked on a new drug discovery programme within its School of Chemistry to help in the fight to treat malaria, one of the world’s deadliest diseases. In an extension of the longstanding collaboration between the School of Chemistry and GSK, fourth year undergraduates from UoN have started work on a new …

From the obvious to the obscure – how the Nottingham Periodic Table is shaping up

Over 300 suggestions have been made for the Nottingham Periodic Table that is being created to celebrate the International Year of the Periodic Table – a task that has certainly captured people’s imaginations! To mark this anniversary year the University of Nottingham is creating its very own Nottingham version of the Periodic Table and has …

Lecture on ‘How Science Got Women Wrong’ from award-winning broadcaster and journalist

Award-winning science journalist Angela Saini is giving a special lecture on International Women’s Day, 8 March, where she will discuss science’s failure to understand women. Angela Saini is an award-winning science journalist and broadcaster. She regularly presents science programmes for the BBC, and her writing has appeared in New Scientist, the Guardian, The Times, and Wired. Her latest book, Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong, was published in 2017 to …

Achieving balance for International Women’s Day

As part of a number of different events taking place throughout the global campuses of the University of Nottingham to celebrate International Women’s Day on Friday 8 March, senior leaders with responsibility for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) at the UK, Malaysia and Ningbo have worked together to support a digital project to celebrate inspirational women …

Dr Laura Dean solves mystery of a fishy ‘virgin’ birth

In this blog, Dr Laura Dean from the School of Life Sciences, tells the story of her discovery of a fish called Mary who left her and her colleagues flabbergasted when they found live embryos that had been fertilised inside her – a pregnancy that’s not meant to happen in the species. ‘Every spring as …