// Archives

70 Years on the University marks its role in the DNA discovery story

The discovery of hydrogen bonds in DNA was made by a young Nottingham Post Graduate student, J. Michael Creeth, in what was known as the Nucleic Acid Laboratory at (the then) University College Nottingham. The results were published in the Journal of the Chemical Society on 1947. The discovery paved the way for the double …

Nottingham remembers its part in the DNA discovery

Tomorrow the University of Nottingham celebrates the 70th anniversary of the discovery by a young PhD student, J Michael Creeth, of hydrogen bonds in DNA. The event will be attended by leading academics in the field. Fifteen years ago the scientific community celebrated the 50th anniversary of the discovery of DNA by Crick and Watson. …

ESRC annual celebration of social sciences

Academics from University of Nottingham will be playing a major part in this year’s annual festival of social science from the 4-11 November. Now in its 15 year, the Economics and Social Research Council (ESRC) festival will see 316 events across the UK, taking the social sciences to diverse and new audiences covering a range …

The ‘taste’ of Bramley apple juice is put to the test

Volunteers were more than happy to offer their services this weekend when they were asked to give their opinion on which variety of Bramley apple juice tastes the best and why. Many of the hundreds of visitors to this year’s Bramley Apple Festival in Southwell were asked to participate in the blind tasting set up …

Keeping schtum – the unsolved secret of David Jones’ perpetual motion machine

Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff, long standing friend and academic colleague of the late David Jones, has vowed to keep his best kept secret – how his famous perpetual motion machine works. This week Sir Martyn was filmed by the BBC’s Inside Out team opening the brown envelope left by David Jones in his will to …

Yesterday’s ‘red sky’ seen at the microscale

Images of particles from yesterday’s ‘red sky’ have been produced at the microscale by University of Nottingham geologist Dr Beth Steer. The particles, collected from her car after the dust was rained out of the atmosphere were put under a scanning electron microscope using energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry to detect elemental abundances. Having analysed the samples …

A musical eulogy to Jeremy the lefty snail

As the global media respond to the sad news that the University of Nottingham’s left-spiralling snail Jeremy, has died, an American fan of the story has released a musical eulogy to console Jeremy’s scientist Dr Angus Davison. Lydia Hiller was inspired to record her original tribute ‘The Tragical ballad of Jeremy the Left Twisting Snail’ …

The Ada Lovelace effect

The Ada Lovelace effect Ada Lovelace, the ‘Countess of Computing’, was born in London on 10 December 1815. The daughter of Lord Byron, Ada Lovelace was a gifted mathematician recognised for creating the first computer programme and forseeing a digital future. Every year scientists across the world mark Ada Lovelace Day – which is being …

The 3D selfie is here!

Computer scientists at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University have solved a complex problem that has, until now, defeated experts in vision and graphics research. They have developed technology capable of producing 3D facial reconstruction from a single 2D image – the 3D selfie. Their new web app allows people to upload a single …

Is Sugar really that bad for you? – Dr Judy Swift decodes the “nutri-babble”.

Judy Swift, Associate Professor of Behavioural Nutrition in the School of Biosciences at the University of Nottingham, led the session “Is the Sugar the new fat?” at the British Science Festival this year. Dr Rebecca Dewey was there and reports here about the day. Photo courtesy of @POST_UK Dr Swift’s work, together with Dr Duane Mellor, …