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Applications for our 2017 BSA Media Fellowships are now open

Experience life as a science journalist Do you want to find out, first hand, how academic research is reported by the media and play an active part in the process? For the third year running the University of Nottingham is offering funded places on the British Science Association’s  2017 Media Fellowships Scheme. The BSA Media Fellowships …

A hologram, a family scandal and a man on the march: the French election just got really exciting

Paul Smith, Associate Professor in French and Francophone studies, writes for The Conversation Embattled presidential candidate François Fillon probably looked at the political calendar in the first week of February and thanked his lucky stars that the spotlight shifted, for a weekend at least, to other candidates in the French election race. Lyon became the …

American Disruption

Professor Todd Landman reviews the inauguration of Donald Trump and the days that followed. Friday 20 January  and Saturday 21 January 2017 will go down in American history as some of the most dramatic and starkly contrasting days in US politics for some time. The inauguration of Donald Trump on 20 January 2017 as the 45th …

Consensus is not a dirty word

This blog by Michael Merrifield, Professor of Astronomy in the School of Physics and Astronomy at The University of Nottingham, has been given extra poignancy by recent comments from the Trump transition team. Science is, by its very nature, a collective activity “If it’s consensus, it isn’t science.”  This quote from a speech by Michael Crichton …

Human rights expert is appointed to European Committee of Social Rights

Professor Aoife Nolan, from the School of Law  has been elected to the Council of Europe’s European Committee of Social Rights (ECSR) Professor Nolan is Head of the Human Right Law Centre’s Economic and Social Rights Unit (ESR),and Co-Director of the Rights and Justice Research Priority Area at the University. Professor Nolan was nominated by …

Race, Rights and Justice in the Age of Brexit

Professor Todd Landman,Pro Vice Chancellor of the Faculty of Social Sciences, puts forward his recommendations for the post-Brexit future and challenges everyone to consider their responsibility for living, humanely, in a post-referendum world. In Democracy and the Market, Adam Przeworski argues that transitional countries experience a significant downturn in economic performance in the short term and then as democracy takes …

Crossing the Rubicon

Aris Georgopoulos, Assistant Professor in Law, looks at why the Supreme Court Should Not Refer a Question Regarding the Revocability of Article 50 to the European Court of Justice.  On 3 November the High Court issued its long awaited judgement in R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union  which ruled that …

Guy Fawkes night: celebrating the most famous act of counter-terrorism in history

Dr Louise Kettle from the School of Politics and International Relations writes for The Conversation about one of the most famous terrorists of all time… ‘With the terrorism threat level remaining at “severe” (meaning an attack is highly likely), and the head of MI5, Andrew Parker, warning that “there will be terrorist attacks” in Britain, there is a climate …

The Last Leg: Clinton’s Probable Victory and the Ruptured Soul of America

Professor Todd Landman, Pro Vice Chancellor of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Christopher Phelps, Associate Professor of American Studies, review the final week ahead of the US Election. A week away from the U.S. presidential election, America limps to the finish line, exhausted and divided. Intense outsider passion propelled by voters’ desires for new …

End Game: Trump’s House of Cards

Professor Todd Landman reviews the last presidential debate ahead of the US election. With only 20 days until polling day, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are on the last leg of the campaign to become the next President of the United States. It has been a long and tumultuous 18 months as the two most …