Manuscripts Mysteries: Canada, Cake and Clergymen

The stereotypical, romanticized view of archives is one where researchers delve into a box of yellowed, long-forgotten papers to uncover clues and solve a mystery. But what happens when the boxes present more questions than they answer? For the last few months we’ve been turning to social media in an attempt to find out more …

How does it feel now you’ve won the war?

Guest blog by Dr Richard Gaunt It’s the name of a bridge and a railway station in London, an island in the South Shetland Islands, several townships and cities across Australia, a region in Ontario, Canada and – for good or ill – the title of the most famous song ever to have won the …

Inky Fingers and Flyaway Footprints

It’s not every Saturday you run into Roman hairdressers and chain mail-clad Vikings, but that’s exactly what happened to MSC staff at a rather breezy Mayfest last weekend! It was the first year that the Humanities building had been used as a venue for the University’s annual community day, and we were based in the …

The Countess, the Castle and the Captain

An interesting collection of documents has recently been catalogued and made fully available to researchers. The Bentinck family, Counts of the Holy Roman Empire, were cousins of the Dukes of Portland (see their family tree) The first Count, William Bentinck (1704-1774), inherited the Dutch lordships of Rhoon and Pendrecht. In 1733 he married Charlotte Sophie, …

The German perspective on the First World War

The final lunchtime talk held in connection with our current exhibition ‘All Quiet in the Weston Gallery’ takes place tomorrow. With the nation gearing up to commemorate the 100 year anniversary of the First World War, through exhibitions, tv and radio programmes, books and articles, debate is, unsurprisingly, focused on British involvement in the war. …

‘Why I changed my name and did my duty’

This Wednesday sees the second of our lunchtime talks held in connection with our current exhibition ‘All Quiet in the Weston Gallery’.   In “Why I changed my name and did my duty”-one family’s experience of World War One, Emeritus Professor Malcolm Jones tells the fascinating story of the three Vince brothers who all enlisted …

Maps, Military and More at Mayfest 2014

Manuscripts & Special Collections staff were kept busy at The University of Nottingham’s annual community open day, Mayfest, on Saturday 10th. We were again fortunate that enough staff are prepared to help out for us to keep two stalls running for the whole day. This year’s theme for our Portland Building stall was maps. Two …

Throwback to The Gongster

  A collection of student newspapers dating back nearly 120 years is proving to be a rich resource for researchers and staff at The University of Nottingham. Manuscripts and Special Collections has almost a complete run of the University’s student magazine, The Gongster, from its inception in 1939 to its closure in 1978. It was originally created as …

A Marvellous Time at Mayfest!

Manuscripts & Special Collections staff were kept very busy at this year’s Mayfest, the University’s annual Community Open Day held on the 18th May, as over 1000 people visited the two separate events: ‘Marvellous Manuscripts’ in the Portland Building and ‘Wade into Water’ at Lakeside Arts Centre. Conservation staff were on hand at ‘Marvellous Manuscripts’ to show …

Displaying D.H. Lawrence

Residents and visitors to Nottinghamshire are enjoying a fortnight of activities and events related to D.H. Lawrence, featured as part of Broxtowe Borough Council’s annual Lawrence Festival, which was launched on Wednesday 5 September.   The 1920s themed opening event included a preview of this year’s Festival exhibition, entitled ‘D.H. Lawrence Controversy on Canvas, The Warren Gallery, London, …