How exercise can help overcome stress

Written by Lucy Tyler   According to mental health charity Mind, it is estimated that there will be approximately 2 million more adults experiencing poor mental health by 2030, compared to 2013 in the UK1. According to the Mental Health Foundation, around 45% of adults in the UK report having poor mental health and medication …

Altered gene expression in neurotransmitter pathways observed in Schizophrenia

Written by Vaishali Gursal (3rd year BSc Neuroscience)   Schizophrenia is a severe, long-term debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder whereby an individual is unable to separate their own thoughts from reality. The exact causes of schizophrenia are unknown, although environmental and genetic factors combined can enable susceptibility to trigger the condition. Positive and negative symptoms of the …

Physical exercise can improve memory in later life

Written by Lucy Tyler There is a large body of evidence indicating a self-renewing population of neurons throughout life in the human brain, but if that is the case why do people suffer from age related neurodegenerative disease and memory deficits? This is likely to be because the number of cells that can form new …

The role of Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in diabetes and obesity

Written by Vaishali Gursal (3rd Year BSc Neuroscience) Diabetes and obesity are arguably the most serious health problems of the 21st century. Tackling both serious health problems is a priority in the scientific and health communities, hence there has been a lot of ongoing research observing processes, proteins, hormones and specific tissues in the body …

New mechanism for the spreading of pain in inflammatory arthritis

Written by Lucy Tyler   As the home of the Arthritis Research UK Pain Centre, much of the research conducted at the University of Nottingham’s School of Life Sciences in the Queen’s Medical Centre, is based on chronic pain and how it can be treated more effectively. Arthritis is an umbrella term for disorders of …

Are Plant-based Diets Good for the Brain?

Written by Vaishali Gursal (3rd year BSc Neuroscience)   Earlier this month, a study by the University of Oxford concluded that a global switch to a plant-based diet (rich in fruits and vegetables, along with a heavily decreased consumption of red and processed meat) could cut greenhouse gas emissions by two-thirds, reduce global expenditure on …

Optogenetics: Illuminating Research by Controlling Cells with Light

By Laura Humphrys, Postgraduate Research Student   Optogenetics allows us to switch cells on and off using light. The term ‘optogenetics’ is easiest to understand when broken down into its two important features: ‘opto’ meaning light, and ‘genetics’ referring to DNA and our biological makeup. Different techniques associated with optogenetics all have the common goal to …

‘Superbugs: The Fight For Our Lives’ Exhibition Review

By Viviane Mignone, Postdoctoral Fellow The indiscriminate use of antibiotics over the last century has created a global threat that is responsible for approximately 700,000 deaths a year, worldwide. The current projections state that by 2050, 30 million people may die from a superbug infection. The attempts to stop this exponential rise of superbugs involves …

Blue Planet II: A Call to Action

By Daniele D’Agostino and Stephanie Heyworth, Postgraduate Research Students Each episode of Blue Planet II has been watched by an average audience of 10 million, and the series has already been sold to more than 30 countries, with the potential for the series to become a global hit. This is not surprising as the documentary …