The power of art – giving a voice to the oppressed

Guest post by Ibitsam Ahmed, PhD student in the School of Politics and International Relations. A recurring theme throughout the events marking LGBT History Month at The University of Nottingham was how arts and culture have been some of the most powerful avenues of queer expression and solidarity. I was fortunate enough to present at two …

From ‘homophobic’ to treasured items – highlights from our lesbian pulp fiction discussion

Claire Henson, People and Culture Events Co-ordinator at the University, writes about our event with Dr Kaye Mitchell on Wednesday 10 February exploring the phenomena of lesbian pulp fiction. I first discovered lesbian pulp fiction when I was working in a university library. I remember seeing the cover of Odd Girl Out by Ann Bannon, …

Lesbian pulp fiction: then and now

In advance of our event on Wednesday 10 February, Dr Kaye Mitchell, Senior Lecturer at The University of Manchester, writes about the lesbian pulp fiction genre. How queer were the 1950s? We tend to think of this as a period of conservative retrenchment and censoriousness, but Jennifer Terry has suggested that, by the 1950s, homosexuality …

Dark Age sexualities – part three

In his last LGBT History Month post, Professor Ross Balzaretti, Department of History, concludes his examination of sexuality in the Dark Ages. It is frequently presumed that women in the distant past had no or little voice in public affairs. This is far from true. For example, in the Carolingian Empire (which covered most of modern …

‘Read Hear’ at Nottingham Central Library, and the need for lesbian and gay literature

In this post, Claire Henson, Equality and Diversity Officer, looks forward to two upcoming events and discusses the importance of the written word for the LGBT community. When I think about things that make me happy, reading books instantly pops into my mind. I have loved books for as long as I can remember. Reading …

Dark Age sexualities – part two

In his second post, Professor Ross Balzaretti, Department of History, continues to explore sexuality in the Dark Ages. Alcuin of York, one of the most influential advisors of Charlemagne (the famous emperor of the west in the early ninth century), may have been gay. That, at least, is the conclusion of some of those who …

Expressing the Unspeakable – DH Lawrence’s ‘The Rainbow’

It’s often overlooked compared to Lady Chatterley’s Lover or its sequel Women in Love, but to mark LGBTQ History month, Manuscripts and Special Collections is looking at D H Lawrence’s The Rainbow, fittingly enough published a century ago in 1915. The set-up is typical for a Lawrence novel: a working-class family, the Brangwens, live in …