The power of art – giving a voice to the oppressed

Guest post by Ibitsam Ahmed, PhD student in the School of Politics and International Relations. A recurring theme throughout the events marking LGBT History Month at The University of Nottingham was how arts and culture have been some of the most powerful avenues of queer expression and solidarity. I was fortunate enough to present at two …

Out in Education – increasing LGBT awareness in schools, one year on

Guest post by Bryony Harper, president of the Nottingham branch of Out in Education. For some background, read their post from last year’s LGBT History Month. Out in Education is a student-led project which takes Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans* (LGBT*) students into local schools to share their experiences in order to increase the understanding of …

Lesbian pulp fiction: then and now

In advance of our event on Wednesday 10 February, Dr Kaye Mitchell, Senior Lecturer at The University of Manchester, writes about the lesbian pulp fiction genre. How queer were the 1950s? We tend to think of this as a period of conservative retrenchment and censoriousness, but Jennifer Terry has suggested that, by the 1950s, homosexuality …

Dark Age sexualities – part three

In his last LGBT History Month post, Professor Ross Balzaretti, Department of History, concludes his examination of sexuality in the Dark Ages. It is frequently presumed that women in the distant past had no or little voice in public affairs. This is far from true. For example, in the Carolingian Empire (which covered most of modern …

Dark Age sexualities – part two

In his second post, Professor Ross Balzaretti, Department of History, continues to explore sexuality in the Dark Ages. Alcuin of York, one of the most influential advisors of Charlemagne (the famous emperor of the west in the early ninth century), may have been gay. That, at least, is the conclusion of some of those who …

‘An undoubted war hero’: the life and tragedy of Alan Turing

In this post, Professor David Brailsford, School of Computer Science, looks at the life and work of Alan Turing ahead of a free public lecture on Wednesday 25 February. Alan Turing graduated from Cambridge University in 1934 with a First Class Honours degree in Mathematics. Even in his undergraduate years he was identified as an outstanding talent by …

Dark Age sexualities – part one

In this guest post, Professor Ross Balzaretti, Department of History, explores sexuality in the Dark Ages. February 2015 marks the eleventh anniversary of my module ‘Sexuality in Early Medieval Europe’ which challenges students to compare their own ideas about sex and sexuality with those to be found in in western Europe in distant writings from …

Expressing the Unspeakable – DH Lawrence’s ‘The Rainbow’

It’s often overlooked compared to Lady Chatterley’s Lover or its sequel Women in Love, but to mark LGBTQ History month, Manuscripts and Special Collections is looking at D H Lawrence’s The Rainbow, fittingly enough published a century ago in 1915. The set-up is typical for a Lawrence novel: a working-class family, the Brangwens, live in …

Tackling LGBT issues in the classroom

Lucy Wake and Bryony Harper discuss the work of Out in Education, a not-for-profit organisation which delivers workshops, lessons and assemblies about what it is to be LGBT in primary and secondary schools. Lucy is a recent graduate from The University of Nottingham, and Bryony is studying Humanistic Counselling Practice at the University. Bryony, Assistant …

Prostitution, sodomy and colonial India

Throughout February we’ll be highlighting some of the research taking place at the University which touches on LGBT history, culture, health and art. In this guest post Stephen Legg, Associate Professor in the School of Geography, introduces his research into prostitution in colonial India. Specifically, how the authorities ‘support’ of brothels was based in their attitudes …