The Midlands Historical Review–Editor Lucy Mounfield describes Nottingham University’s own interdisciplinary arts and humanities journal!

Midlands Historical Review was established in 2017 by a group of PhD students from the History department at the University of Nottingham. Their original aim to start a peer-review interdisciplinary journal providing a platform and learning repository to showcase excellent research in the field of the arts and humanities is still at the forefront of …

Dr. Gwilym Dodd’s new article in the English Historical Review, “County and Community in Medieval England”

The English Historical Review, Volume 134, Issue 569, August 2019, Pages 777–820 The ‘county community’ is something of a hot potato amongst late medieval political historians. Since the publication of an influential article by Christine Carpenter in 1994, in which she condemned the county community as anachronistic and conceptually flawed, research on the political structures …

Nottingham Medieval Studies 63, Special Issue, “Heretical Self-Defence”

  Nottingham Medieval Studies is pleased to announce the publication of Volume 63 (2019), which is a Special Issue featuring the proceedings of the ‘Heretical Self-Defence’ conference organised by the Medieval Heresy and Dissent Research Network (MHDRN) and hosted here at Nottingham at Easter 2018. https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/humanities/departments/history/research/research-projects/current-projects/medieval-heresy-and-dissent.aspx= The conference addressed themes and questions raised in modern …

Sheryllynne Haggerty starts Leverhulme Fellowship

This year, courtesy of support from a Leverhulme Research Fellowship, Dr. Sheryllynne Haggerty will be working on a new monograph tentatively titled “Merchants and Managers; Sojourners and Slaves.”  Her goal is to produce the first in-depth examination of the lives of ordinary Jamaican people at the start of the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763).  A rare …

David Robinson’s new article on the mutual constitution of European and Imperial history

This month, we highlight David Robinson’s article, “Morals, Manners, and Marriage: Domestic Discourse in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth- century Italy and Britain,” which appeared in the January issue of the Journal of British Identities.     David writes: “this paper has emerged from my PhD research, which compares British travel accounts of India with those of Italy, from around …

Deserters from the British Civil Wars

Historians have long been interested in the huge numbers of vagrants who trod the roads of early modern England, David Appleby writes, and whether the ‘rogue’ literature of the time genuinely reflected (or incited) a widespread panic about such travellers. Their enquiries have fed into a wider debate which seeks to understand how communities grappled …

Reading the Holy Name of Jesus in the 15th Century

At some point between 1420 and 1450 the Yorkshire gentleman Robert Thornton of Ryedale copied a number of English and Latin texts on devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus into his own book (now called the Lincoln MS 91). As Rob Lutton shows in a new article (see link), Thornton and other medieval Christians …

Nottingham and the Pentrich Rebellion of 1817

Late in the evening of Monday 9 June 1817, some fifty to sixty men set out from the villages of Pentrich and South Wingfield in Derbyshire on a fourteen-mile march towards Nottingham. They believed themselves to be in the vanguard of a Rebellion which would see ‘clouds of men’ descend from the north of England.  …

The Florence Nightingale Project

In case you didn’t know, the History department is host to an Arts and Humanities Research Council-sponsored project led by Anna Greenwood with Paul Crawford and Richard Bates that investigates the local legacy of Florence Nightingale who, as well as having a famous student hall named after her, also did some nursing.  The project aims …

Were the Waldensians Heretics?

In 1214 Peter of les Vaux-de-Cernay, chronicler of the Albigensian Crusade (1209-29), stated that after taking the town of Morlhon, south of Rodez, “we found seven heretics of the Waldensians sect; they were at once led to the legate and confessed their unbelief freely and fully.  The crusaders seized them and burnt them with great …