The First BME Nurse in the NHS – by Professor Lynn McDonald

In our latest guest blog, Professor Lynn McDonald, editor of the Collected Works of Florence Nightingale and co-founder of the Nightingale Society, outlines the little-known story of Kofoworola Abeni Pratt, the first black nurse to work in the NHS. Mrs “Rola” Pratt was an outstanding nursing leader. When the Windrush Empire arrived in the U.K. in …

‘We’re in an incredibly privileged position, to be able to care for people’ – interview with Sir Stephen Moss

Sir Stephen Moss is a nurse who has had a distinguished career in NHS management. He spent seven years as Director of Nursing at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary before moving to the Queens Medical Centre in Nottingham in 1984, where he worked for 20 years. He also worked as a Commissioner on the first NHS …

Nightingale and big data – BBC video

Just thought I would share this BBC video from last week on Florence Nightingale and Big Data. It does a good job of highlighting Nightingale’s passionate interest in statistics and evidence-based policy making. The video might also have mentioned that Nightingale went out of her way to generate data where none existed for her to …

Writing About Florence Nightingale: Annie Matheson’s 1913 Biography

Our second guest blog comes from Val Wood, a former nurse and nurse educator and supporter of a number of historical and heritage initiatives across Nottinghamshire. Val is chair of Nottingham Women’s History Group. Right: Cover of Matheson’s book, published 1913 by Thomas Nelson & Sons, London. Image courtesy of Rowena Edlin-White. Over fifty biographies …

‘Mythical Florence’: Where Does the Lady with the Lamp Stand Today?

In this piece for the AHRC, also published on their blog, Dr Jonathan Godshaw Memel describes Nightingale’s uncomfortable relationship with public representations of herself. Florence Nightingale remains curiously familiar to us today. Whether or not she intended it herself, her fame has lasted well beyond her lifetime. But where do depictions of the Lady with …

‘Locating Health’ workshop review

Many belated thanks to everyone who came along to our first academic workshop, entitled ‘Locating Health‘, which ran at the University of Nottingham on 11 January. It was a really great day, and I know I certainly learned a lot from a fascinating set of papers! I have written a review of the event which …

“Families coming into hospital are guests in our house, and we should make them welcome”: An interview with Dame Elizabeth Fradd

Dame Elizabeth Fradd is one of the UK’s foremost nursing administrators, and was vice-chair of the University of Nottingham Council from 2012-18. She has variously served as Assistant Chief Nursing Officer (Nursing Practice) for the Department of Health, Director of Nursing and Education in the West Midlands Regional Office, and Nurse Director and lead Director for …

The Aqueduct Cottage

Our first guest blog post comes from Ron Common, a Derbyshire resident who has volunteered in the area around Florence Nightingale’s home as a DerwentWISE Cultural Heritage Volunteer. Ron has been championing the case for an abandoned building standing on what is known as the ‘Nightingale Branch’ of the Cromford Canal. You can find out more …

Locating Health workshop Jan 11 – programme announced!

The programme for the Locating Health workshop at the University of Nottingham (Humanities Building) is now live. It can be viewed via this link to the workshop webpage. The workshop is open to all and registration is free – as is the lunch and wine reception if those tempt you! If you wish to attend, …

Paul Crawford’s piece for The Conversation

Here’s a link to a piece published by Professor Paul Crawford, who heads the current Nightingale project, a few years back. It shows how Nightingale’s compassionate and humanist approach to healthcare is in danger of being lost in today’s fixation on metrics, targets and production-line methodologies. https://theconversation.com/florence-nightingale-carried-the-lamp-but-modern-nurses-carry-the-can-25114