Pagans and Christians

By Professor Lesley Abrams How helpful are the terms ‘pagan’ and ‘Christian’, or the concept of the ‘conversion to Christianity’, in explaining the political, religious, and cultural transformation experienced in Scandinavian England in the ninth and tenth centuries? The Viking armies who came to Britain were initially followers of potentially diverse forms of paganism, with …

Vikings in your Vocabulary

By Dr Richard Dance What do English words like egg, husband, law, leg, sky and window have in common?  And what about words used in the dialects of northern and eastern England, like lug (‘ear’), mun (‘shall, must’) and rammy (‘disgusting’)?  The answer is that all these probably came into early English from Old Norse, …

Danelaw Saga: Bringing Vikings Back to the East Midlands – a student’s view

By Kayla Kemhadjian The Danelaw Saga exhibition housed in the Weston Gallery at Nottingham Lakeside Arts may seem like a small addition to the Bringing Vikings Back to The East Midlands project. However, intricately weaved in a room which typically houses manuscripts is a wealth of information about how the Vikings shaped the East Midlands. …

Viking: Rediscover the Legend – a student’s view

By Jessica Sims When most people think of the Midlands, they think of a place neither here nor there – a grey area in Britain with no discernable features of its own. Academics interested in the study of the Viking Age have tended to look at areas further north such as York when thinking about …

Danelaw Saga: Bringing Vikings Back to the East Midlands

By Ursula Ackrill The Weston Galley’s Danelaw Saga tells a new and exciting story with Viking finds borrowed from museums as well as with manuscript and printed exhibits sourced from Manuscripts and Special Collections at the University of Nottingham. The exhibition complements the current University of Nottingham Museum’s exhibition Viking: Rediscover the Legend by focusing …

Lunchtime Lecture Preview: Assembling Vikings: Thinking through Things in the East Midlands

By John Baker A feature of the Viking diaspora was the establishment of Thing sites, places of regular popular gatherings, where disputes were settled and justice was done. The Old Norse word thing (usually written þing) meant ‘assembly’, and some Thing sites are famous as places of government—Thingvellir, location of the Icelandic Althing, Tinganes, historically …

Viking and Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire

By Cassidy Croci Before the Great Heathen Army descended upon the East Midlands in the late ninth century, the area was known as Mercia, a kingdom controlled by the Anglo-Saxons. Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture is scattered across this landscape. On Monday 17th July members of the Centre for the Study of the Viking Age set out …

Repton in the Viking Age

One of the aims of our project is to find out more about what happened in the East Midlands in the Viking Age. A key site near to our Nottingham base is Repton, in Derbyshire. This was an important centre of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia, and the burial site of several of its kings. It was …

First Glimpse of Viking: Rediscover the Legend

Welcome to the Viking blog! Here we will be sharing stories and information relating to the two Viking exhibitions coming to Lakeside Arts later this year. Viking: Rediscover the Legend will bring together objects from the British Museum and York Museums Trust. It will be on in the Djanogly Gallery from the end of November until early March. In December, …