April 20, 2018, by Matt Davies

The Scaling the Sublime Artcode project by DHC volunteer Chloe Austin.

This year volunteers from the Digital Humanities Centre (DHC) teamed up with Crop Up Gallery to create the online content for Lakeside Arts current exhibition: Scaling the Sublime: Art at the Limits of Landscape. Volunteer Chloe Austin reflects on the project below.

left to right, Cecily Rainey, Molly Evans, Poppy Wickenden and Chloe Austin at the private view of Scaling the Sublime: Art at the Limits of Landscape.

left to right, Cecily Rainey, Molly Evans, Poppy Wickenden and Chloe Austin at the private view of Scaling the Sublime: Art at the Limits of Landscape.

A few weeks ago, I attended the private view of Scaling the Sublime: Art at the Limits of Landscape and was finally able to see the Artcodes that myself and Crop Up Gallery members have been working on in action! The completion of this project has been a long time coming and it was great to see the Artcodes in use.

The project began with a meeting with Nicholas Alfrey, Co-Curator of Scaling the Sublime, and Neil Walker, Head of Visual Arts Programming at Lakeside Arts. Nicholas gave us a talk on the exhibition and Neil told us what he wanted from the online content. Neil was keen to encourage more students to visit the gallery and also wanted the online content to offer something different from the visitor guide and exhibition catalogue.

Many of the artists in the exhibition collaborate with specialists from different disciplines to produce their work. We took inspiration from this and decided to interview students from outside History of Art and ask them for their interpretations of the artworks. The students we spoke to study a range of subjects, from Mechanical Engineering to Geography to Astronomy, so we heard a lot of interesting interpretations of the artworks. We actually felt out Art Historian-ed by some of the interviewees, due to their fantastically creative observations.

Molly and Artcode

Molly, who designed the Artcodes for the exhibition, was inspired by the ship featured in Mariele Neaudecker’s, Afterlife. Here she is trying out her handiwork.

After Life, Mariele Neudecker, mixed media installation, 2016

After Life, Mariele Neudecker, mixed media installation, 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the interviews were edited by Poppy all that remained to do was to upload them onto YouTube and link the videos to the Artcode App. The videos can be accessed via the Artcodes App while in the gallery and can be viewed anytime here. The Artcodes allow visitors to engage easily with the online content of the exhibition while in the gallery and I think they are a useful tool for connecting digital content with real life experiences.

Working on the Artcodes project was a fantastic experience. It was so exciting to see Molly’s Artcodes in the gallery. I hope the Artcodes will enhance the experience of visitors to the exhibition and encourage them to engage with, and form their own interpretations of, the artwork on display.

photo of Team synchronising clocks for Scaling exhibition

The team helped to install Katie Paterson’s, Timepieces (Solar System) by synchronising the clocks which tell the time on the planets in our solar system and Earth’s moon.

The team helped to install Katie Paterson’s, Timepieces (Solar System) by plugging in the batteries.

Katie Patterson, Timepieces (Solar System), 2014 in Djanogly Art Gallery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many thanks to Sophie Laycock, Gauri Patel, Robbie Clarey, Thomas Peterken, Richard Creswick, Kezia Way, Laura Baker, Anna Winder, Denise Odong, Adon Emery and Alexander Pidd, for volunteering to be interviewed, and to Matt Davies, the DHC Manager, and Ben Bedwell from the Mixed Reality Lab, for their invaluable help on this project.

Scaling the Sublime: Art at the Limits of Landscape is at Lakeside Arts until Sunday 17th June.

Find out more about Artcodes.

View our videos here:

Learn more about Crop Up Gallery.

Posted in DHC Volunteers