Making Sense of Deleuzian Problematisation

Last night, the Centre for Critical Theory had the pleasure of hosting international visiting speaker, Jeffrey Bell, Professor of Philosophy at Southeastern Louisiana University in the US. Professor Bell is a well-known scholar in the field of Deleuze Studies. Among his book-length publications are The Problem of Difference: Phenomenology and Poststructuralism (University of Toronto Press: …

Third Speaker in the Toxic Positivity Series: Liz Morrish

On Tuesday 21st May, the third speaker in our Toxic Positivity series was Liz Morrish. She is an independent scholar and activist for resistance to managerial appropriation of the university who spoke out about mental health in the university three years ago. It resulted in her resignation from an academic post, but did not end …

Toxic Positivity in the University – Second Speaker: Dr Jamie Woodcock (16th May)

Please do join us for the second instalment of the Centre for Critical Theory’s ‘Toxic Positivity in the University‘ series which is taking place next week. Dr Jamie Woodcock (University of Oxford) is a sociologist of work who focuses on digital labour, the gig economy and resistance. At 5pm in room A46 of the Trent Building, on …

The Extreme Centre: A Warning (Review)

Ivan Markovic, a current MA in Critical Theory and Politics student and formerly research assistant in the Centre for Critical Theory, reviews Tariq Ali’s latest book … Roused by the recent election campaign and its incredibly tedious aftermath – characterized by a number of (pseudo)pundits discussing the repercussions of the results without actually offering real …

Syriza and the Global Minotaur

Abi Rhodes, taking our MA in Critical Theory and Politics, provides some much-needed perspective both on the situation in Greece and on a key text by Greece’s newly elected finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, who now faces an enormous but crucial task in challenging the politics of autsterity in Europe …. Syriza and the Global Minotaur The beginning of …

Vital Theory Paper: Re-membering, human rights and neoliberalism

The human rights project, ostensibly hegemonic since the collapse of communism, has gained most traction in so- called transitional societies, a term which does not describe an anomaly, so much as it does a practice designed to manage the global order of things. It describes the ever more frequent process in which the end of …

Conference: The Subject of Addiction (8-9th September)

Dear All, I am delighted to be able to alert you to The Centre for Critical Theory’s upcoming conference entitled The Subject of Addiction: Culture and Clinic which is taking place in Highfields House on the 8th and 9th of September. This interdisciplinary event brings together critical and cultural theorists with clinical practitioners in order to interrogate …

Documentary Film Screening: Chile’s Student Uprising

Film Screening with Director Q&A. June 3rd, 17:00-19:00, LG140 Hallward Library.

Is The Unconscious Historical? (Part 2)

This interview is published in two parts. In Part 1 discussion focused on the origins of psychoanalysis, its historical debt to hysteria and the fall of the ‘Master’. In this second part, the discussion moved onto the symptoms of neoliberalism and the challenges faced by the clinician and the activist. SG: If hysteria is a symptom of …

Is the Unconscious Historical?: Conversations on the Origin of Psychoanalysis and its Clinical and Political Relevance Today (Part 1)

This interview will appear in two parts. In Part 1, the discussion focused on the origins of psychoanalysis, its historical debt to hysteria, and the fall of the ‘Master’ … Samuel Grove: In my own work I am interested in the consilience between Darwin, Marx and Freud. Darwin and Marx were incontrovertibly historical thinkers. In what …