Minority Dance, Minority Dancers

Written by Emily Wilcox. Most Americans would be hard-pressed to distinguish a waltz from a tango or a salsa from a jitterbug. However, in the People’s Republic of China, average citizens can easily identify and distinguish between Uyghur dance, Mongol dance, Tibetan dance, Korean dance, Dai dance, and so on. I know, because recently while …

The Chinese Government Hops on the WeChat Bandwagon

Written by Zixue Tai and Xiaolong Liu. Like everywhere else, social media is an increasingly pervasive presence in Chinese society. Leading the market are the three behemoths QQ, Weibo and WeChat. QQ, the PC-based instant messaging service lately crossing over to the smart-phone market, is the oldest (debuted in 1999 by Tencent) and boasts over 800 …

Prolonged Calm: The Propaganda of Positive Thinking

Written by David Volodzko. In the Autumn of 1934 the Red Army began its Long March retreat to escape the grip of the Kuomintang. The bedraggled survivors arrived a year later in the town of Yan’an where they recouped under the command of Mao Zedong. By the time they took power and established the PRC …

The enduring themes of Chinese propaganda

Written by Matthew Johnson. Two of the most enduring and seemingly paradoxical features of China’s propaganda state are its staying power and steady decline. In English, the word ‘propaganda’ is often deployed as an epithet for media that appears crassly manipulative or one sided. Public relations firms, advertisers, newspapers, and governments may be accused of spreading …

A New Internet World, A Neo-Authoritarian Model of Internet Governance

Written by Min Jiang. Following the Third Plenary Session of the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China held in Beijing from November 9th to November 12th, 2013, news arrived that the government wants to control its web even more (Mozur, 2013). Despite the spectacular growth of the Chinese Internet in the last …

The Mass-Media Logic behind China’s Internet Controls

Written by Florian Schneider. How the Chinese government is applying 20th Century thinking to 21st Century technology. One of the most popular technology myths to this day is that digital communication is difficult or even impossible to control – a sentiment that has been captured succinctly by John Gilmore’s argument that “the Net interprets censorship as …

The Great Fearwall of China

Written by Jonathan Benney. The term “Great Firewall”, intended to convey that China’s Internet is surrounded in its entirety by a border which restricts outside content, was first used in 1996 by technical journalists and was popularized in 1997 by Geremie Barmé and Sang Ye in their article “The Great Firewall of China”, in the …

Chinese Political Warfare in the 21st Century

Written by Russell L.C. Hsiao. One poorly understood element of Chinese military strategy in the 21st Century is political warfare. While many China-military watchers in the West possess an encyclopedic knowledge of Chinese military hardware and their attendant capabilities, few analysts have acquired an adequate understanding of political warfare as a modern Chinese political and military …