China Policy Institute Blog

Beijing’s Hong Kong dilemma

Written by Stephen Morgan. Speculation is rife about how the Chinese Party-State will handle the Hong Kong protests against the 31 August decision to restrict selection of the candidates for the 2017 election of the Hong Kong SAR Chief Executive. Tens of thousands have filled the streets. The Admiralty area has been shutdown since the …

Beijing face to face with universal suffrage promise

Written by Surya Deva. After days on the streets, thousands of Hong Kong residents are still occupying several major streets of their city. Already nicknamed as the “umbrella movement” because of protesters’ use of umbrellas to shield against the police’s pepper spray, this is the fruit of indifference from both Beijing and the local government …

The Umbrella Revolution in Hong Kong: a second Tiananmen?

Written by John Keane. Are political developments in Hong Kong heading for a second Tiananmen massacre? A fortnight ago, partly to provoke discussion, partly to sound an alarm, I suggested in a radio interview that unless the Chinese government wisely handled the fast-unfolding dynamics, things in Hong Kong might well come to that. At the …

Protests a warning to China of dangers posed by Hong Kong wealth gap

Written by Damian Tobin. The pro-democracy protesters in the streets of Hong Kong, once again confront Beijing with the age-old conundrum of how to balance authoritarian control and the demands of a complex modern society. For Beijing, this conundrum is particularly acute as the Communist Party has long lacked the ability to mobilise popular opinion …

Hong Kong protests grow, but humiliation at home has robbed Cameron of clout on China

Written by Niv Horesh. The referendum on Scottish independence was hailed in many parts of the world as a shining example of democracy in action. Not so in China. There, in a concerted campaign to shape public opinion, the state-controlled media devoted an extraordinary number of column inches to criticising a process that came close …

Sunflower Movement and the future of democracy in Taiwan… and Hong Kong

Written by Jean-Pierre Cabestan. Having left Taiwan in 1998 after a five year stay there, I am more distant from every day’s political developments there. I am therefore somewhat hesitant to contribute to this blog. Of course, I have regularly returned to the island, and more often so since I moved back to Hong Kong …

Redefining Hong Kong SAR: The Mainland Security Crackdown Arrives

Written by Daniel Garrett. Within the last few weeks, the political situation in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) has deteriorated precipitously as China’s central and local regimes began implementing the outlines of a mainland-style security crackdown against the city’s pro-democracy movement and escalated its United Front campaign against Occupy Central with Love and …

Beijing, Taipei, and Hong Kong: One Step Forward, One Step Back

Written by Alex Calvo. After reporting from East Asia dominated by clashes at sea for weeks, the trip to Taiwan by Zhang Zhijun seemed to offer a glimpse of hope for the peaceful resolution of the myriad disputes haunting the region. The minister for the PRC’s State Council-level Taiwan Affairs Office (TAO) is not only …

Hong Kong’s Fundamentalists

Written by Jennifer Eagleton. Fundamentalist groups rigidly stick to core beliefs and maintain the “integrity” of their sacred text and practices to the exclusion of all others. Compromise is an anathema and ultimate domination of their dogma is their aim. After the 1997 handover, two unassailable fundamentalist “doctrines” seem to have appeared in Hong Kong: …

Sir Percy Cradock, the Handover and UK-China relations

Written by Kerry Brown. Just after I had left the British Foreign Office in 2005, to work independently on raising awareness of China and the opportunities from engaging with the country commercially and politically, I remember having the idea that the UK had a major advantage over many competitors because of its unique experience of …