China Policy Institute Blog

An Alternative Solution to Corruption Control in China: To Raise Xi Jinping’s Salary?

Written by Alfred M. Wu. Methods for targeting corruption in China have been a fascinating topic among practitioners and academics. The Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Chinese Communist Party is investing all its energy into fighting ‘tigers’ in order to frighten all public officials out of corrupt behaviours. Alternative solutions to the current the anti-corruption movement have been discussed …

Are Chinese Anti-Corruption Campaigns Still Campaigns?

Written by Ling Li. Campaigns, as an enforcement approach, are the antithesis to routine enforcement. It means that campaigns are first and foremost temporary and periodic, aimed at creating deterrence in a short span of time by mobilising additional resources and deploying them in a concentrated manner. The anti-corruption campaign, as it has been unanimously characterised …

Fighting Corruption

Written by Joseph Fewsmith.Xi Jinping’s campaign against corruption is now over two and a half years old. It has certainly gone on longer, cut deeper, and affected more people than anyone might have imagined at its inception. There are at least two aspects of this campaign that are of considerable interest: the first is what …

Xi Jinping’s Internet anti-corruption campaign

Written by Ping Shum and Zheng Yongnian. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) plays an increasing role in fighting corruption worldwide. The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has extended e-government in the fight against crime and against corruption in particular.  By promoting Internet anti-corruption efforts and encouraging the general public to participate, the Chinese party-state under Xi …

Can judicial reforms reduce the incidence of torture in China?

Written by Jackie Sheehan. Former CIA agent Bob Baer famously identified the different purposes of America’s “extraordinary rendition” programme of torture out-sourcing, explaining that “If you want a serious interrogation, you send a prisoner to Jordan. If you want them to be tortured, you send them to Syria. If you want someone to disappear – never to …

The Chinese Government Hops on the WeChat Bandwagon

Written by Zixue Tai and Xiaolong Liu. Like everywhere else, social media is an increasingly pervasive presence in Chinese society. Leading the market are the three behemoths QQ, Weibo and WeChat. QQ, the PC-based instant messaging service lately crossing over to the smart-phone market, is the oldest (debuted in 1999 by Tencent) and boasts over 800 …

Does Authoritarian Government Respond to the Chinese People?

Written by Ma Liang. Authoritarian regimes are usually characterized as being less responsive to its citizens in comparison to democratic governments. The use of Internet and other cutting-edge information and communication technologies (ICTs) have substantially transformed the process of government operation. An interesting question to be answered is whether and how authoritarian governments equipped with ICTs respond to …

From the “Great Firewall” to the “Great Cannon”: The misleading metaphors of Internet filtering in China

Written by Séverine Arsène. In a recent report on a China-related attack against Github and Greatfire, a group of researchers coined the term “Great Cannon” to describe a new outbound, aggressive turn in the Chinese Internet censorship strategy. That is in contrast with the previously prevalent metaphor of the “Great Firewall,” which sounded more static …

Chat and Mouse: The Online Game of Indirect Deliberation

Written by Nele Noesselt. Following the so-called Twitter and Facebook ‘revolutions’ of the Arab Spring, digital communication technologies and social media have, once again, been hyped up as facilitating the emergence and empowerment of civil society. This new critical mass of netizens was expected – exclusively based on the power of the virtual online word – …

Audacity and Dilemma—China’s English Language News

Written by Jing Ning Conover. The relationship between the media and the government in China is a complex issue. The government used to initiate the communication process by expressing its official stand through the media. The media then performs its role by conveying the message to the public. However, since the first decade of this century, when …