China Policy Institute Blog

China’s Responsiveness to Internet Opinion: A Double-Edged Sword

Written by Jonathan Hassid. China’s obvious press censorship can mask the surprising reality that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) responds quickly to public opinion, especially when it is expressed online. The system strongly discourages political discussion and criticism but is highly responsive to incidents that evade the gauntlet of censorship and capture public attention. Commentators, reporters …

Confucius Institutes and China’s ‘soft power’

Written by James F. Scotton. Confucius Institutes, the Chinese government’s language and cultural centres hosted by universities throughout the world, are facing increasing academic resistance in the west. The Institutes, first launched in 2004, have been a remarkable success. By 2011 there were more than 400 Confucius Institutes plus an equal number of Confucius Classrooms in …

From globalized corruption to globalized anti-corruption

Written by Hu Angang. Development is the core pursuit of all societies. However, as the saying goes, there is no free lunch and there is always a price to pay for development. Corruption is one such cost. In the seminar held by the research department of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection in 1995, I advanced …

Exhibiting Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement: An end or a beginning?

Written by Denise Y. Ho.  May 17th in Hong Kong marked the opening of a two-week ‘Umbrella Festival’, named after the Umbrella Movement, a pro-democracy sit-in protest that lasted from September to December 2014. The Umbrella Movement was one of the largest political demonstrations the city — once a British colony, now a Chinese “special administrative …

Anti-Corruption: Can shock therapy sustain party’s leadership?

Written by Zhuang Chen.Chinese leaders at various junctures have advocated fighting against corruption; mainly with feeble results. A cynical common view is that anti-corruption campaigns are nothing more than “loud thunder with small raindrops”. However, it seems that Xi Jinping has made anti-corruption a key plank of his presidency, thus elevating it to new heights. In …

An Alternative Solution to Corruption Control in China: To Raise Xi Jinping’s Salary?

Written by Alfred M. Wu. Methods for targeting corruption in China have been a fascinating topic for practitioners and academics. The Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Chinese Communist Party is investing all its energy into fighting ‘tigers’ in order to frighten all public officials to give up corrupt behaviours. Alternative solutions to the current the anti-corruption movement have …

Are Chinese Anti-Corruption Campaigns Still Campaigns?

Written by Ling Li. Campaigns, as an enforcement approach, are the antithesis to routine enforcement. It means that campaigns are first and foremost temporary and periodic, aimed at creating deterrence in a short span of time by mobilising additional resources and deploying them in a concentrated manner. The anti-corruption campaign, as it has been unanimously characterised …

Fighting Corruption

Written by Joseph Fewsmith.Xi Jinping’s campaign against corruption is now over two and a half years old. It has certainly gone on longer, cut deeper, and affected more people than anyone might have imagined at its inception. There are at least two aspects of this campaign that are of considerable interest: the first is what …

Xi Jinping’s Internet anti-corruption campaign

Written by Ping Shum and Zheng Yongnian. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) plays an increasing role in fighting corruption worldwide. The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has extended e-government in the fight against crime and against corruption in particular.  By promoting Internet anti-corruption efforts and encouraging the general public to participate, the Chinese party-state under Xi …

Can judicial reforms reduce the incidence of torture in China?

Written by Jackie Sheehan. Former CIA agent Bob Baer famously identified the different purposes of America’s “extraordinary rendition” programme of torture out-sourcing, explaining that “If you want a serious interrogation, you send a prisoner to Jordan. If you want them to be tortured, you send them to Syria. If you want someone to disappear – never to …