China Policy Institute Blog

Human Resources as China’s National Power: Why Document No. 35 Is Not Enough

Written by Huang Wei. China’s State Council recently issued Implementation Opinions on Deepening the Reform of Admission System ([2014] No.35), which outlined the forthcoming reform in higher education admission. The guiding principle of the proposed reform is to enhance the fairness and efficiency of the selection of talent. Pilot reforms will start in 2014, expand …

China takes the lead on emissions trading, but economic reform is needed

Written by Frank Jotzo. China has long had a string of regulatory policies that constrain its growing thirst for energy, and that aim to reign in coal consumption. But it looks like the country may be about to enter a new era, where market mechanisms are harnessed in pursuit of environmental and broader economic objectives. …

China’s Twin Quests for Energy Security and Low-carbon Transition

Written by Guy C.K. Leung. Another round of the UN climate conference will be held in New York on 23 September, and it is a good time to review the energy governance of the world’s biggest carbon emitter, and its implication for global climate change. China faces an “energy dilemma” as it seeks to ensure continuity …

Interpreting Japan’s right to collective self-defense

Written by Kei Koga. The Abe administration’s reinterpretation of the right of collective self-defense on July 1, 2014 has become the center of political attention both domestically and internationally. Although there are many focal points revolving around the re-interpretation, the core of the debate stems from two basic questions: why did the reinterpretation need to …

Japan’s Security (R)evolution

Written by Sebastian Maslow. Since his comeback as prime minister in December 2012, Abe Shinzo has vigorously pushed for a redesign of Japan’s security system. As such he has proposed to ‘take Japan back’ from its constraining post-war regime and to restore a ‘strong Japan’ capable of deploying its military forces overseas in support of …

GM in China: ‘Paranoia’ and public opinion

Written by Sam Geall. Biosafety certificates permitting Chinese researchers to grow genetically modified rice and corn expired last week, with little indication that the Ministry of Agriculture will renew them. The certificates, issued in 2009, concerned two types of Bt rice, which express a gene of the bacillus thuringiensis bacterium, conferring pest resistance, and phytase …

China in Latin America: A Deepening Friendship

Written by Ariel Armony. What did Beijing hope to gain from President Xi Jinping’s visit to Latin America?  As we know, the Chinese leader had an intense agenda planned for the region: the BRICS summit in Brazil (and corresponding talks with leaders from UNASUR – the Union of South American Nations), a meeting with the “Quartet” …

Beijing, Taipei, and Hong Kong: One Step Forward, One Step Back

Written by Alex Calvo. After reporting from East Asia dominated by clashes at sea for weeks, the trip to Taiwan by Zhang Zhijun seemed to offer a glimpse of hope for the peaceful resolution of the myriad disputes haunting the region. The minister for the PRC’s State Council-level Taiwan Affairs Office (TAO) is not only …

Vietnam’s ‘silent service’ challenge

Written by Brian Benedictus. On May 28th at the Admiralty Shipyards in St. Petersburg, Russia, the last of six Kilo-class diesel electric submarines (SSK) purchased by the government of Vietnam, was laid to complete construction.  The vessels, for the People’s Army of Vietnam Navy (VPN) in 2009, are expected to become the capital ships of the PAVN upon their completion …

For China: Make Maps, not War in the South China Sea

Written by Harry J. Kazianis. With the United States once again preoccupied with events in the Middle East China has made another strategic adjustment to its claims in the South China Sea. It seems clear by now that Beijing has found a new way to bolster its position in what Stratfor analyst Robert D. Kaplan …