China Policy Institute Blog

Beijing, Taipei, and Hong Kong: One Step Forward, One Step Back

Written by Alex Calvo. After reporting from East Asia dominated by clashes at sea for weeks, the trip to Taiwan by Zhang Zhijun seemed to offer a glimpse of hope for the peaceful resolution of the myriad disputes haunting the region. The minister for the PRC’s State Council-level Taiwan Affairs Office (TAO) is not only …

Vietnam’s ‘silent service’ challenge

Written by Brian Benedictus. On May 28th at the Admiralty Shipyards in St. Petersburg, Russia, the last of six Kilo-class diesel electric submarines (SSK) purchased by the government of Vietnam, was laid to complete construction.  The vessels, for the People’s Army of Vietnam Navy (VPN) in 2009, are expected to become the capital ships of the PAVN upon their completion …

For China: Make Maps, not War in the South China Sea

Written by Harry J. Kazianis. With the United States once again preoccupied with events in the Middle East China has made another strategic adjustment to its claims in the South China Sea. It seems clear by now that Beijing has found a new way to bolster its position in what Stratfor analyst Robert D. Kaplan …

Making bilateral relations newsworthy – China’s impossible challenge?

Written by Vivien Marsh. There are few phrases more likely to strike dread into a western global journalist’s heart than “bilateral relations” and “expanding ties”. They portend a news story of excruciating dullness peopled by national leaders and diplomats in suits getting on and off planes. For western hacks accustomed to finessing catchy leads and …

American Resolve, Not Concessions Needed to Maintain Stability in Asia

Written by Brian Benedictus. Soon after his ascension to the presidency of the PRC in 2012, Xi Jinping stated his desire to establish a “new great power relationship” with the United States. Although Xi’s doctrine remains short on specifics, there is an underlying theme of each side clarifying its interests in order to avoid direct …

Obama’s Visit to Asia: Successful Rebalancing or Not?

Written by Misato Matsuoka. A lot of emphasis was put on President Obama’s recent visit to Asia as it was the first trip to the region during his second term and came amid concerns about the effect of the Ukraine crisis on the long promised rebalancing policy. After he failed to make his trip last …

China’s porous (western) borders

Written by Alessandro Rippa. Over the last few weeks a number of events have drawn attention, once again, to the issue of illegal border crossing out of the People’s Republic of China. Some of these events were tragic, like the deadly clash between a group of Uyghurs and Vietnamese border guards, while others rather bizarre, like the …

Revisiting China’s Non-Interference Policy Towards Intrastate Wars

Written by Mordechai Chaziza and Ogen S. Goldman. Since its foundation, Beijing has experienced several major shifts in its behaviour towards the outside world. As a long-time champion of equal sovereignty, non-interference and peaceful resolution of conflicts, China has displayed extreme caution in refraining from interfering in the domestic affairs of other countries and from endorsing the …

China and Intervention: Is Beijing really a ‘monster’ that protects tyrants?

Written by Shogo Suzuki. The People’s Republic of China (PRC) has long been considered a conservative power with regards to sovereignty and intervention. China’s history of being reduced to a ‘semi-colony’ at the hands of the Western powers and being forced to undertake ‘modernisation’ to fulfil the Western-dictated ‘standard of civilisation’ has left a powerful …

China’s non-interference policy: PRC leaders and the realist perspective

Written by Edward Friedman. How would a realist IR theorist describe the purposes and actual behavior in a CCP claim that PRC foreign policy is premised on a principle of non-interference? How would a PRC leader comment on the realist analysis? From a realist IR perspective, “the strong do what they will; the weak do what they …