China Policy Institute Blog

Towards an Understanding of a Global China: A Latin American Perspective

Written by Ariel C. Armony. When we talk about China and its relationship with Latin America, we do so almost exclusively in economic terms. However, we also need to understand the political dimension of this relationship. One must be careful – this is not about ideologies of the left or right. Rather, it is about understanding …

China’s Approach to the Syrian Crisis: Beyond the United Nations

Written by Yun Sun. The war in Syria warrants a unique mention in the history of contemporary Chinese foreign policy. In the context of this crisis, never before has China exercised its UN Security Council veto power as many times as it has over Syria. Out of the ten vetoes the People’s Republic of China …

China’s Role in UN Peacekeeping: A Robust Shift?

Written by Chin-Hao Huang. In September 2014, China made an historic announcement that it would send a 700-strong infantry force to South Sudan as part of a UN peacekeeping mission. The decision came just eight months after the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) sent a motorized infantry brigade to Mali, another historic first in China’s involvement in …

“Terrorism” or Terrorism in Xinjiang?

Written by Oana Burcu. A decade after 9/11 focused attention on terrorism, there is still no common understanding or definition of what terrorism is. To add another layer of complexity, the use of language in media and political discourses further increases misunderstandings and creates misperceptions. For instance, western media outlets came under criticism from China when …

Norm Consumer, Norm Entrepreneur: China in the UN Peacekeeping Regime

Written by Courtney J. Fung. There are almost 130,000 UN peacekeepers in the field today, with over two thirds in active conflict zones. The United Nations is now in charge of the second largest fielded ‘army’ in the world, spread across sixteen diverse missions. China is a key UN player. A veto-empowered state, often leading …

Passive Activism: China and the Middle East in the UN

Written by Yitzhak Shichor. Having been excluded from the UN for over two decades, Mao’s China often condemned the UN as an evil organisation under whose auspices the United States, the Soviet Union and other member-states initiated intervention, intimidation and committed aggression against many countries, first and foremost China. In October 1971 China was admitted …

You Must Have One Country Before You Have One Country, Two Systems

Written by Don Rodgers. The People’s Republic of China officially views Taiwan as a “sacred and inseparable part of China’s territory.” Yet, Taiwan is currently a de facto independent country with its own territory, economy, democratic government, and military. This obviously causes the leaders in Beijing no small degree of heartburn. To make matters more …

Hong Kong, Taiwan and the End of the “One Country, Two Systems” Dream

Written by Alex Calvo. The ideological foundations of China’s 1911 Revolution and previous attempts to overthrow the Qing rested, among other things, on three pillars: modernization, recovery of full sovereignty, and setting up a modern nation-state. All of these were connected to a great extent, historically and ideologically, to Hong Kong and Taiwan. When the …

Occupy Central and the marginalization of pro-democracy parties in Hong Kong

Written by Ng Hoi Yu. The Occupy Central Movement (OCM), also known as the Umbrella Revolution, broke out in Hong Kong on 28 September. It was triggered by the decision of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPCSC) on arrangements for the 2017 Chief Executive election, which requires all candidates to be vetted by …

The Mixing of Well and River Water: Hong Kong under the “One Country, Two Systems”

Written by Jennifer Eagleton. The concept of “One Country, Two Systems” (一國兩制) was originally devised with Taiwan in mind and was subsequently repurposed for Hong Kong, so that Hong Kong could maintain its capitalist system while the socialist s