China Policy Institute Blog

Revisiting China’s Non-Interference Policy Towards Intrastate Wars

Written by Mordechai Chaziza and Ogen S. Goldman. Since its foundation, Beijing has experienced several major shifts in its behaviour towards the outside world. As a long-time champion of equal sovereignty, non-interference and peaceful resolution of conflicts, China has displayed extreme caution in refraining from interfering in the domestic affairs of other countries and from endorsing the …

China and Intervention: Is Beijing really a ‘monster’ that protects tyrants?

Written by Shogo Suzuki. The People’s Republic of China (PRC) has long been considered a conservative power with regards to sovereignty and intervention. China’s history of being reduced to a ‘semi-colony’ at the hands of the Western powers and being forced to undertake ‘modernisation’ to fulfil the Western-dictated ‘standard of civilisation’ has left a powerful …

China’s non-interference policy: PRC leaders and the realist perspective

Written by Edward Friedman. How would a realist IR theorist describe the purposes and actual behavior in a CCP claim that PRC foreign policy is premised on a principle of non-interference? How would a PRC leader comment on the realist analysis? From a realist IR perspective, “the strong do what they will; the weak do what they …

Special Issue on China’s Non-interference Policy

For decades, the principle of non-interference has been an unchanging pillar of China’s foreign policy–in rhetorical terms if not always in behaviour. The non-interference principle has served to protect China from outside interference as well as protecting Beijing’s allies from the pressure at the United Nations and other international institutions. However, as China assumes a greater …

What does China’s new White Paper on Aid need to say?

Written by Philippa Brant. China is now one of the top 10 largest foreign aid donors in the world. Yet, much about its aid program is still shrouded in mystery. The release of the first white paper on China’s foreign aid in April 2011 was an important first step in China becoming more open about …

China’s Defense Budget is Going Up? Who Cares?

Written by Harry J. Kazianis. Recently China issued its latest defense budget numbers revealing a 12.2% increase in funding for that nation’s armed forces. While many pundits quickly took to the pages of various blogs and op-ed pages—some of which offered some finely balanced and tight analysis—I had a different take: Who cares? OK, let …

U.S.-Vietnam Defence Relations: Convergence Not Congruence

Written by Carlyle A. Thayer. Military-to-military relations between Vietnam and the U.S. developed slowly after the normalization of diplomatic relations in July 1995 mainly due to Vietnamese sensitivities and concern that defense relations might outstrip economic ties. In 2000, William Cohen became the first U.S. Secretary of Defense to visit Hanoi. The year 2003 proved pivotal. …

Vietnam at a Crossroads

Vietnam finds itself at a crossroads facing multiple challenges. It is challenged internally as voices calling for economic and political liberalizations are becoming more vocal and it is challenged externally too as Vietnam’s stakes in the region are on a conflicting trajectory with its important economic partner and powerful neighbour: China. In this sense Vietnam …

Alternative modernities and international trade in China

Written by Alessandro Rippa. “Welcome to Yiwu International Trade City”. The mechanical voice of the taximeter greets me as soon as my cab leaves Yiwu’s new train station on a cold, foggy morning. The three-hour trip from Shanghai has been a comfortable ride on a new “Harmony”, the bullet trains that are becoming a common feature of …

China’s new petitioning guidelines and social governance policy

Written by Samantha Hoffman. On 25 February, the Communist Party of China’s (CCP) Central Committee and the State Council introduced guidelines on reforming the country’s petitioning system, highlighting the rule of law in handling petition cases and expanding channels for petitioners to address officials. The guidelines have received limited attention in western media—after all, it …