Taiwan’s retired generals: A gold mine for China?

Written by J. Michael Cole. “From now on, we should no longer separate the Republic of China [ROC] Army and the People’s Liberation Army [PLA] — we are all China’s army.” There is nothing particularly shocking about such remarks, which are in line with Beijing’s position on Taiwan, a self-ruled, democratic island it regards as a …

New developments in the Taiwan-Uyghur Nexus

Written by Yu-Wen Chen. Uyghur activists have been working closely with Taiwanese independence-minded activists to create a Taiwan Friends of Uyghurs organization, expanding the global Uyghur national self-determination movement’s outreach to the island. This new development arrives at a time when Beijing is again tackling deadly violence in Xinjiang, accusing “Uyghur terrorists” for inciting unrest. …

Taiwan’s Anti-Media Monopoly Movement: Achievements and the future

Written by Chou Ya-Wei. The beginning of Taiwan’s anti-media monopoly youth movement dates back to July 31, 2012, when we started the first series of protests against the emerging media monopoly in Taiwan. We, mostly young Taiwanese, launched a

Economic Integration and Cultural Divergence: Obstacles to Political Integration Across the Taiwan Strait

Written by Jens Damm. One of the most intriguing features of the current cross-Strait policies of Ma Ying-jeou, especially since his re-election as President of the “Republic of China (on Taiwan)” in 2012, is the divergence between the expectations of many outside observers of a rapid rapprochement between the two sides in the political arena …

People to People interactions across the Taiwan Strait

Written by Chun-Yi Lee Since martial law was lifted in 1987, Taiwanese people have been visiting China for family reunions, tourism or business and investment purposes. According to the Chinese immigration agency, from November 1987 to November 2012, China welcomed more than 70 million Taiwanese residents. Nevertheless, Taiwan did not release restrictions on Chinese visitors until …

The Folly of a cross-Strait “China Dream”

Written by Russell Hsiao. The pace and scope of dialogue across the Taiwan Strait have expanded considerably since Ma Ying-jeou became the President of the Republic of China (ROC) in 2008. These dialogues, led by non-governmental organizations, business and cultural associations, and political parties, have served as the main channels through which the two governments on both …

On an even-keel? Cross-Strait Relations in Ma’s Second Term

By Steve Tsang. In terms of cross-Strait relations, President Ma Ying-jeou’s second term did not really start last year when he assumed office. It has only just begun. The real change that drives the relationship does not happen in Taipei but in Beijing. The break came with Xi Jinping’s assumption of all three top offices …

Behind Beijing’s East Asian Maritime Assertiveness

By Chong-Pin Lin. For China 2008 was a year of diplomatic harvests. Not only did Beijing reach agreement with Moscow in October on their disputed borders of more than 4,000 kilometers, it did the same with Hanoi on the 1,300 km long border at the year’s end. In May, Chinese President Hu Jintao concluded a …

Sorry Beijing, You Probably Won’t Get Much More From Ma Ying-jeou

By J. Michael Cole. The breadth and scope of the liberalization that has occurred in the Taiwan Strait since the election of Ma Ying-jeou of the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) in 2008 has been nothing short of extraordinary, at least if this progress is contrasted with what came before. For Ma critics, the KMT has …

Media Freedom in Taiwan: The Real Threat of Monopoly

By Ketty W. Chen. During the past winter break, a group of university students traveled around Taiwan in the back of a small, old pickup truck, embarking on what they ultimately named the “To the End of the World and back Tour” (一車走天涯串聯行動)