China Policy Institute Blog

Pakistan and Beijing’s Xinjiang Problem

Written by Rizwan Zeb. Xinjiang holds immense strategic significance for Beijing. It is also increasingly vulnerable as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement (ETIM) continues its armed resistance against Beijing and seeks the establishment of a Muslim caliphate in East Turkistan as they call it. Some people believe that ETIM was responsible for a series of bomb blasts …

Multi-layered Sino-Pakistan relations

Written by  Abhirup Bhunia and Pravakar Sahoo. On the side-lines of the 14th SCO summit meeting, Chinese President Xi Jinping met Pakistani national security and foreign affairs adviser Sartaj Aziz and confirmed that Pakistan remains its top priority. Pakistan sees China as its all-weather friend, and vice versa. Both China and Pakistan have had largely undemocratic …

A reappraisal of Pakistan-China relations

Written by Filippo Boni. The turmoil in Islamabad since 14 August, where protests led by the cleric Tahir-ul Qadri and the former cricket player Imran Khan brought violence into Islamabad’s red zone, has plunged Pakistan into political chaos yet again. Despite the elections in 2013, an historic moment as for the first time in the country’s history …

A tale of two border towns

Written by Alessandro Rippa For those who are accustomed to the experience of crossing land borders, particularly in the remote and mountainous regions of Central Asia, the idea that borders grow and spread into the territories they are meant to enclose is accepted knowledge. For instance, the Sino-Pakistani border at Khunjerab Pass expands to the 200-plus …

Strategic Ties Between China and Pakistan

Written by Ehsan M. Ahrari. One characterization of China-Pakistan ties is to label the relationship an “all weather alliance.” A more realistic depiction of it is to portray it as kaleidoscopic in nature. In such a relationship, China remains the dominant partner. However, even in that capacity, it seems to have concluded that the significance of …

Anti-ship missiles in the defence of Taiwan: Limited war or people’s war?

Written by Alex Calvo. More than thirty years on, the shadow of the 1982 Falklands War looms large over East Asia, as made clear by Japanese PM Abe’s increasingly frequent references to the conflict. While democratic politicians may seek inspiration in Lady Thatcher’s refusal to condone aggression, military officers are busy studying the conflict’s many …

Time to Bring the Orphan In From the Cold

Written by J. Michael Cole. “We hope the Americans will continue supporting us, not just selling us … defense articles.” Thus spoke Shen Lyu-shun, Taiwan’s top envoy to the U.S., during a recent interview with the Washington Times. After nearly six years or relative calm in the Taiwan Strait, and with the specter of more …

Remembering China in the Great War

Written by Alex Calvo. It is sadly still not widely known that thousands of Chinese labourers were recruited to work on the Western Front, undertaking a wide range of tasks, among them unloading military supplies, handling munitions, building barracks and other facilities, digging trenches, constructing fortifications, agriculture, and forest management. Those hired by the UK …

China in Latin America: A Deepening Friendship

Written by Ariel Armony. What did Beijing hope to gain from President Xi Jinping’s visit to Latin America?  As we know, the Chinese leader had an intense agenda planned for the region: the BRICS summit in Brazil (and corresponding talks with leaders from UNASUR – the Union of South American Nations), a meeting with the “Quartet” …

Keeping China in Check: How North Korea Manages its Relationship with a Superpower

Written by Adam Cathcart. Around the world today, knowing how and when to deflect the will of the Chinese Communist Party seems to be something of a common theme. Beijing’s confidence is manifest at every turn: When one of its top leaders arrives in London, China seems to expect nothing less than audiences with the Queen, …