China Policy Institute Blog

Tuning Out Beijing’s Six-Party Drumbeat

Written by Adam Cathcart. You know things are not going particularly well for China’s diplomatic efforts in Pyongyang when a visit by a small second-rank student song-and-dance ensemble from Dalian starts to look like of some kind of breakthrough in relations. But with the DPRK making ever-louder noises about some new-style nuclear deterrent, that is …

What does China’s new White Paper on Aid need to say?

Written by Philippa Brant. China is now one of the top 10 largest foreign aid donors in the world. Yet, much about its aid program is still shrouded in mystery. The release of the first white paper on China’s foreign aid in April 2011 was an important first step in China becoming more open about …

Sir Percy Cradock, the Handover and UK-China relations

Written by Kerry Brown. Just after I had left the British Foreign Office in 2005, to work independently on raising awareness of China and the opportunities from engaging with the country commercially and politically, I remember having the idea that the UK had a major advantage over many competitors because of its unique experience of …

Chinese Research and Development: More D than R

Written by Yutao Sun and Cong Cao. Funding for applied and basic research in China remains low despite huge amounts being spent. A recent OECD report on research and development around the world threw up some headline statistics for China to cheer. In 2012, the country invested 1.98 percent of its GDP in R&D, more …

Vietnam’s Relations with China – A Multifaceted Partnership

Written by Ramses Amer. Vietnam’s relationship with China is of paramount importance for its development and security. Although much outside attention is focused on the disputes between the two countries in the South China Sea, the relationship is much broader and multifaceted than these disputes alone. The long historical interaction between the two countries is …

Who lost Ukraine?

Written by Neil Munro. In a televised interview with Russian journalists this week, Vladimir Putin made the claim that a “revolutionary situation” had existed in Ukraine since 1991. The ordinary Ukrainian had seen little benefit from the Soviet collapse and subsequent transformations of the economy and politics. Corruption and the growth of social inequality had …

U.S.-Vietnam Defence Relations: Convergence Not Congruence

Written by Carlyle A. Thayer. Military-to-military relations between Vietnam and the U.S. developed slowly after the normalization of diplomatic relations in July 1995 mainly due to Vietnamese sensitivities and concern that defense relations might outstrip economic ties. In 2000, William Cohen became the first U.S. Secretary of Defense to visit Hanoi. The year 2003 proved pivotal. …

Vietnam’s Balancing Strategy

Written by Zachary Keck. In the face of the growing threat it faces from China, Vietnam is pursuing a shrewd diplomatic strategy that seeks to balance against Beijing while preserving as much autonomy as possible. Traditional international relations theory suggests that states facing a security threat will balance against that threat in one of two …

China and the US: Its good to talk

Written by Kerry Brown. No two powers in history have, at least in the last forty years, talked to each other so much as the US and China. It has been the source of a massive industry of commentary and analysis. It has even been institutionalized in the US China Strategic Political and Economic Dialogue. …

An Asian Century Paradox

Written by Lauren Johnston. The phrase “Asian Century” is linked to a 1998 meeting between former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping and former Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi. Implicit in comparison to the 20th “American” Century and the 19th “British” Century it induces speculation as to the parallel geopolitical and economic implications for the 21st. Yet …