China Policy Institute Blog

How the Internet is shaping PRC development: Three schools of thought in China

Written by Daniel Lynch. Over the past few years I have followed Chinese writings on the impact of the Internet on PRC society.  I’m not so much interested in discovering a definitive answer, but I am trying to understand the range of debate on this critical but impossibly complex question. Understanding the range of debate …

Mobile Film Projection in Socialist and Post-Socialist China

Written by Tina Mai Chen. The study of propaganda in socialist and post-socialist China generally focuses on the content and aesthetic conventions of specific genres of material including film, posters, and literature. Another area of scholarship attends to the political contexts that shape the production, circulation, and reception of propaganda. Less studied, but equally important …

Chinese food culture: Influences from within and without

By Ken Hom. In Food in Chinese Culture (Yale, 1978), Michael Freeman writes that any cuisine worthy of the name comes not from a single tradition, instead it “amalgamates, selects, and organizes the best of several traditions.” While sampling foods in restaurants and homes throughout China, I have been impressed by how many commonalities there are between …

Making bilateral relations newsworthy – China’s impossible challenge?

Written by Vivien Marsh. There are few phrases more likely to strike dread into a western global journalist’s heart than “bilateral relations” and “expanding ties”. They portend a news story of excruciating dullness peopled by national leaders and diplomats in suits getting on and off planes. For western hacks accustomed to finessing catchy leads and …

China’s global media: Mixed signals

Written by Vivien Marsh. If my former BBC boss Richard Sambrook was right to question the survival of 24-hour rolling television news in the social media age, why are the Chinese authorities now hugely expanding their own such operations in order to get their message across overseas? China may have banished Western social media infrastructure …

The Shaw Brothers and the Taiwan Film Industry

Written by Ming-Yeh Rawnsley. Movie mogul Run Run Shaw (邵逸夫) passed away on 7 January 2014. Many observers have commented on the Shaw Brothers’ empire (邵氏電影公司) and its contribution to Hong Kong cinema. However I would like to add to the discussi

Online counter-hegemonic resistance in China’s Hong Kong

Written by Daniel Garrett. The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) is well known as a “City of Protests” but fewer are aware that Hongkongers’ vivacious dissent against hegemonic rule and social injustice also extends into virtual Chinese and HK Internet spaces as much as its physical streets and public spaces.  As postmodernist movements and …

Searching Guangzhou: Regionalising Weibo

Written by Wilfred Yang Wang. “Known to many in the West as ‘Canton’, Guangzhou is the first city most travellers to mainland China visit. Wrapped in a perpetual haze of pink smog and flashing neon lights, the city overwhelms with its energy, colour, and sheer size. Influenced by neighbouring Hong Kong, consumerism has swept up …

Nationalism and Escalation in the East China Sea

Written by Jessica Chen Weiss. Is compromise or de-escalation possible in the ongoing standoff between China and Japan over the Diaoyu/Senkaku islands? With nationalism resurgent and mistrust deepening on both sides, the role of domestic politics remains crucial in assessing possible paths toward resolving or at least re-shelving the territorial issue. Any compromise in the …

Corruption in the Chinese Media Industry: No Easy Solutions

Written by Maria Repnikova. The recent corruption confession by Chen Yinzhou, a Guangzhou-based journalist at New Express, has sparked a debate among China’s media professionals and scholars about the nature of corruption in the journalism industry and what can be done about it. Initially perceived as a victim of pressures from a powerful company, Zoomlion, …