China Policy Institute Blog

China’s global media: Mixed signals

Written by Vivien Marsh. If my former BBC boss Richard Sambrook was right to question the survival of 24-hour rolling television news in the social media age, why are the Chinese authorities now hugely expanding their own such operations in order to get their message across overseas? China may have banished Western social media infrastructure …

The Shaw Brothers and the Taiwan Film Industry

Written by Ming-Yeh Rawnsley. Movie mogul Run Run Shaw (邵逸夫) passed away on 7 January 2014. Many observers have commented on the Shaw Brothers’ empire (邵氏電影公司) and its contribution to Hong Kong cinema. However I would like to add to the discussion a less researched area, that is, from the perspectives of Taiwan’s film industry. …

Online counter-hegemonic resistance in China’s Hong Kong

Written by Daniel Garrett. The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) is well known as a “City of Protests” but fewer are aware that Hongkongers’ vivacious dissent against hegemonic rule and social injustice also extends into virtual Chinese and HK Internet spaces as much as its physical streets and public spaces.  As postmodernist movements and …

Searching Guangzhou: Regionalising Weibo

Written by Wilfred Yang Wang. “Known to many in the West as ‘Canton’, Guangzhou is the first city most travellers to mainland China visit. Wrapped in a perpetual haze of pink smog and flashing neon lights, the city overwhelms with its energy, colour, and sheer size. Influenced by neighbouring Hong Kong, consumerism has swept up …

Nationalism and Escalation in the East China Sea

Written by Jessica Chen Weiss. Is compromise or de-escalation possible in the ongoing standoff between China and Japan over the Diaoyu/Senkaku islands? With nationalism resurgent and mistrust deepening on both sides, the role of domestic politics remains crucial in assessing possible paths toward resolving or at least re-shelving the territorial issue. Any compromise in the …

Corruption in the Chinese Media Industry: No Easy Solutions

Written by Maria Repnikova. The recent corruption confession by Chen Yinzhou, a Guangzhou-based journalist at New Express, has sparked a debate among China’s media professionals and scholars about the nature of corruption in the journalism industry and what can be done about it. Initially perceived as a victim of pressures from a powerful company, Zoomlion, …

Limits of China’s Cultural Diplomacy

Written by Gary Rawnsley. It is not surprising that the government in Beijing has privileged culture and tradition in its soft power strategy as these should be the easiest themes to sell and they avoid giving further prominence to the political and social issues that undermine China’s soft power credibility. The Chinese clearly have an …

The revolution will not be tweeted, either

Written by Jackie Sheehan. After the Global Times last week, now CCP journal Qiushi has condemned online criticism of the ruling party as equivalent to the big-character posters (dazibao) of the Cultural Revolution. In effect, Xi Jinping has announced that today’s netizens, if they challenge the official version of events at all, are no better …

Media War Over Shanghai

Written by Peter Harmsen. For three months during the fall of 1937, hundreds of thousands of Chinese and Japanese soldiers clashed in a titanic battle in and around Shanghai. China’s largest city was the scene of fierce street fighting, while the paddy fields outside the urban areas became reminiscent of the trenches of France and …

Family and Politics in Film: Feng Xiaogang’s “Aftershock” (2010) and Deepa Mehta’s “Midnight’s Children” (2012)

Written by L. H. M. Ling. In the past year, I’ve had the chance to watch two recent films made, respectively, by a Chinese and Indian director and within two years of each other. These are Feng Xiaogang’s “Aftershock” (2010) and Deepa Mehta’s “Midnight’s Children” (2012). Though much differentiates these films, a central theme also …