China Policy Institute Blog

School Education for Migrant Children in Urban China

Written by Ting Liu, Kathryn Holmes and James Albright. China’s rapid economic growth during the past 30 years has fuelled an increased demand for skilled workers, and has resulted in unprecedented internal migration to urban centres. In turn, the focus has turned to the provision of education, particularly in cities, as children previously educated in rural …

Bleak times for foreign media in China

Written by Raymond Li. China is the largest media market in the world, and therefore attracts many foreign media companies which flock into the country on the promise of lucrative returns. However, talking about the situation of foreign media in China is not an easy task, because the picture is not always clear cut as it appears …

Problems in Huallywood

Written by Zhan Zhang. Three years ago, the National Digital Film Industrial Park opened in Wuxi, not far from Shanghai, with the nickname “Huallywood” (Hua meaning China). It was viewed as “ushering in a new golden age of filmmaking in China” and “Huallywood” aimed to become a global digital film capital in China like its counterparts in the …

Taiwan’s presidential election could start a pivot to Beijing

Written by Niv Horesh. Taiwan is limbering up for its 2016 presidential election. Its two main parties have picked their candidates – and gotten very different receptions. When the ruling Nationalist Party (KMT) nominated Hung Hsiu-chu as its candidate for the 2016 Taiwan presidential elections, the reaction was disbelief. Instead of picking its much younger chairman, Eric Chu, …

China’s Responsiveness to Internet Opinion: A Double-Edged Sword

Written by Jonathan Hassid. China’s obvious press censorship can mask the surprising reality that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) responds quickly to public opinion, especially when it is expressed online. The system strongly discourages political discussion and criticism but is highly responsive to incidents that evade the gauntlet of censorship and capture public attention. Commentators, reporters …

Confucius Institutes and China’s ‘soft power’

Written by James F. Scotton. Confucius Institutes, the Chinese government’s language and cultural centres hosted by universities throughout the world, are facing increasing academic resistance in the west. The Institutes, first launched in 2004, have been a remarkable success. By 2011 there were more than 400 Confucius Institutes plus an equal number of Confucius Classrooms in …

Taking stock of the Chinese blogosphere

Written by Shaohua Guo. “China is not yet a country that excels in the art of writing (shuxie, to express feelings and write), but the emergence of blogs …” In October 2002, Isaac Xianghui Mao wrote this on the homepage of CNBlog.org, China’s first online discussion forum about blogging technology and culture. Given that he has …

War-Monger or Judicious Realist ? Liu Mingfu as Historically-Minded America Watcher

Written by Niv Horesh. The publication of Liu Mingfu’s China Dream in English this month makes for an opportune occasion to take stock of his ideas critically.[1] In 2010, the Chinese language version of the book by the retired colonel (b. 1951) caused quite a sensation with his sub-title reading: ‘soldiers must speak out’. Though it is …

China’s Media in Cross Currents: Implications for Critical Journalism

Written by Rongbin Han. To a large extent, the development of Chinese media, particularly critical media, depends on the interaction between market forces, state control, and the rise of social media. Though they have benefited from marketization, softer ideological constraints, and the rise of digital media platforms, Chinese media have to deal with the repercussions …

Sister Lotus and the cult of the selfie in China

Written by Valeria Varriano. This is the age of selfies and selfie sticks. The self-portrait taken by the camera of a smartphone, which is immediately distributed and cast into a network, created a new way and new space of communication, as well as a new form of art. In China, the portrait itself held, for a …