// Archives

Applying Academic Focus to Wider Careers

By Imogen Worrall, Archaeological Science student blogger From GCSE onwards, we are taught to specialise. Narrowing down the number of subjects further and further until at university we are left, usually, with just one. From there, focus shifts into specialisation, commonly in the form of a dissertation. Continuing along the academic path, it becomes easy …

A Camp America experience: what I’ve learned

By Annie Brown, MA Creative Writing student blogger The ‘summer of a lifetime’ at Camp America can be incredibly fun. It is also a fantastic opportunity that can transform your career prospects. Alongside getting to travel and meet lifelong friends, it boosted my employability skills greatly. It helped me become more confident, positive and ambitious, …

Why Volunteering Should Be The Next Thing You Do

By Andrew Hunter, first year mathematics and economics student blogger It is becoming increasingly more difficult to attain valuable work experience with well-known firms in your chosen industry of work. That’s why volunteering is important as it can play such a big part in standing out from the crowd, helping you to succeed in applications …

What job will make me happy?

By Jennifer Balloch, Employability Officer Let’s imagine you start full-time employment when you graduate. If we stop to think about this level of commitment, then asking if you will be happy in your job seems quite reasonable. Happiness in work is a scale and will mean different things for different people. For some people being …

Talking to the right people is a career ‘must do’

By Joel Kaziro, medicine graduate  Having been a teacher for the last five years, I walked into Medical School as a mature student. I figured that at the end of my four-year stint, I’d be a doctor. What I failed to realise was ‘being a doctor’ was not enough; they come in many different shapes and sizes and …

The rise of perfectionism

By Joanne Workman, Employability Education Projects Officer A student asked me recently if I thought ‘perfectionism’ was a good response to the interview question, ‘what’s your biggest weakness?’ This really got me thinking about the perceived value of ‘being a perfectionist’, and how this might impact on careers and employability. Particularly in light of recent …

On a professional course? Tips on self-development, building your portfolio and decision making

By Fady Anis, medicine graduate and junior doctor on the Academic Foundation Programme At the beginning of Medical School, I was fairly adamant that I wanted a career in one of the surgical specialties. My experience and understanding of what it meant to be a surgeon was purely based on the few weeks’ work placement …

5 Job Hunting Tips For Graduates With A Disability

By Christian Jameson-Warren, Employability Education Projects Officer   1. Be clear about the possible implications of your disability in the workplace Managing a disability or health condition in employment may require thinking about strengths and challenges in a different way to at university. Employers have a legal responsibility to make reasonable adjustments so that a …

‘Oh You’ve Just Started University? What Do You Want To Do When You Graduate?’

By Jennifer Balloch, Employability Officer Picture this. You’re in your first year and you’re already getting questions about what you want to do when you graduate. How do you respond? Have you thought about it? Should you be thinking about it this early? Is anyone else thinking about what they want to do? Enter, the …

There’s More Than One Way to Get A Graduate Job

By Shelley Ashenden, Senior Careers Adviser It’s that time of year when there’s an energy and buzz around campus with many employers attending our careers fairs and promoting their graduate opportunities through recruitment presentations. However, it is worth remembering that although graduate schemes are often the most visible option to students, they only account for …