IAPS Blog Assistant Paid Internships

Salary: Approx. £10 per hour (plus holiday pay) Location: Residence in Nottingham is not required Hours: 10-15 hours per month About The Institute of Asia and Pacific Studies is seeking applications for four paid internships to work with the Editor of the Institute of Asia and Pacific Studies’ soon-to-be-launched new blog platform – IAPS Dialogue …

Why China won’t back off the South China Sea – whatever the world might say

Written by Jing Cheng. A much-anticipated ruling on the South China Sea dispute initiated against China by the Philippines finally came down – and unsurprisingly, the Hague-based international tribunal that judged it ruled in favour of the Philippines, rejecting China’s claims of historical rights to the sea’s resources. The Philippines welcomed the ruling, and celebrated …

Enforcing the Southeast Asian Nuclear Weapons-Free Zone Treaty

Written by Roland G. Simbulan All ten members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) signed the Southeast Asian Nuclear Weapons-Free ZoneTreaty (SEA-NWFZT) on 15 December1995 in Bangkok. The ‘Bangkok Treaty’, as it became known, entered into force on 28 March 1997. The NWFZT is considered a model for regional de-nuclearization.  The treaty covers …

Survey Fatigue and the Search for ‘Good’ Data: post-disaster strategies

Written by Claire L. Berja. Leyte in the Eastern Visayas of the Philippines was one of the areas hardest hit by Typhoon Yolanda in 2013. Tacloban, the city that became the ‘poster town’ of the disaster, is located in Leyte facing the Pacific Ocean at the head of the Leyte Gulf. Leyte is one of …

Philippine Election Blog 2016 – The End

Written by Francis Domingo and Pauline Eadie. In late 2015 we started musing over the idea of running a series of articles about the Philippine Elections in 2016 for Ballots and Bullets, a blog run by the School of Politics and International Relations at The University of Nottingham. We knew that the official campaign would …

Philippines 2016: How ‘Dutertismo’ can make a difference

Written by Roland G. Simbulan. The clear mandate given by the Filipino electorate for Davao City mayor Rodrigo Duterte as the next president of the Philippines in the 2016 elections is a clear signal that the nation urgently seeks meaningful social change. The Commission on Elections estimates that 84% of voters participated in the 2016 elections, …

How the Philippines’ new strongman romped into office despite a shocking campaign

Written by Pauline Eadie. Mayor Rodrigo Duterte of Davao City in Mindanao is now president elect of the Philippines. His path to the presidency was controversial, riddled with expletives and reduced his detractors to mud slinging and comparisons with Hitler. But the mud failed to stick: with almost all precincts reporting, he looked to have …

Philippines 2016: The Significance of the OFW Vote

Written by Rachelle Bascara. The Philippine Daily Inquirer collated the positions of the five presidential candidates on ten key issues: poverty, economy and jobs, food security, peace and order, corruption, health care, foreign policy, traffic, climate change, and interconnectivity. Reading through the profiles and action points, there was no mention of Overseas Foreign Workers (OFW). …

Philippine Politics is Still a Man’s World

Written by Julius Ryan Umali. With two female Presidents in tow, it looks like we can boast of being a country where women can aspire to serve in government and succeed. But the milestones aside, the current situation of women in Philippine government is wanting. With this year’s Women’s Month coming on the heels of …

The 2012 Delhi protests: towards a scalar analysis

Written by Srila Roy. The brutal gang rape and murder of 23-year-old Jyoti Singh Pandey in Delhi in December 2012 has come to constitute a ‘critical event’ in contemporary India. This is largely ascribable to the unprecedented public protests that the event propelled. The protests are one critical and representative moment in a changing landscape …