// Latest Posts

Nottingham and Berlin Classics exchange – “Q-Kolleg”

This week saw the conclusion of this round of Q-Kolleg, an international study initiative between the University of Nottingham and the Humboldt Universität zu Berlin based around the visual culture of Classical antiquity. Participants from the Department of Classics at Nottingham were partnered with students from the Winckelmann-Institut, and they engaged in a two-semester programme …

Religious experience and cognitive science

Esther Eidinow updates us on the progress of her AHRC project ‘CAARE’.   As historians, how do we gain insight into the religious experiences of historical subjects? This is the key question behind the project Cognitive Approaches to Ancient Religious Experience, an AHRC-funded network that brings together scholars using cognitive approaches and those working on …

Euphronios and EURO 2016

What does the European Football Championship have to do with Greek art? Andreas Kropp has been tuning in…   Britain is Brexiting, Europe is reeling, and we can’t even begin to comprehend what just hit us. So how about this, let’s instead just focus our attention on that other thing gripping the continent these days, …

What would Plato do? Greek Thought in US Politics

As the 2016 US Presidential election campaign continues to confound forecasters, recent PhD student and Teaching Affiliate John Bloxham discusses classics and American politics. Looking at American politics through the prism of Greek philosophy probably struck a few people as a waste of time when I started my PhD on the reception of Greek thought in …

Long-lived monarchs, ancient and modern

In light of the Queen’s recent 90th birthday, Nicholas Wilshere discusses long-lived monarchs ancient and modern. April 21st marked the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II, an event which prompted royal reporters to make comparisons with other long-lived and long-reigning rulers, and to point out that she is both the longest-lived and longest-reigning British monarch, …

Oedipus showing at the Lakeside

Lynn Fotheringham attends a rehearsal of the Lakeside production of Oedipus and considers the process of fragmentation in modern approaches to  tragedy. After the Greek tragedy film season, Lakeside Arts is putting on another Greek tragedy this week: this year’s annual collaboration with the Nottingham New Theatre is Sophocles’ Oedipus (Steven Berkoff’s version) http://www.lakesidearts.org.uk/theatre/event/3172/oedipus.html. The project, which gives New Theatre students the opportunity to …

Gout: the heroic malady?

Nick Wilshere muses on a ‘humorous’ painful disease: Painful chronic disease is not something that we generally consider a source of humour. Yet gout – inflammation of the joints, especially in the feet, caused by the formation of monosodium urate crystals – has a long history of being discussed in playful and humorous ways. As long ago …

Queen of the Silver Arrow competition

      Prize: copy of Queen of the Silver Arrow, signed by Caroline Lawrence. Write a tweet or a blogpost (up to 500 words) to tell us how children’s literature or media has influenced your understanding of or enthusiasm for the Greeks and Romans. Were you inspired to become a classicist by reading Harry …

The challenge of Virgil as children’s literature

Helen Lovatt explores Virgil as YA literature: Caroline Lawrence has just published Queen of the Silver Arrow, an excellent retelling of Virgil’s Camilla episode, with Barrington Stoke, aimed at reluctant teenage readers. It is simply written, with a reading age of about 8, but contains challenging content more suitable for 12+. This makes it really …

From Aulis to Game of Thrones

Lynn Fotheringham tells us about the story of Iphigenia: I became fascinated with the story of the sacrifice of Iphigenia when I was a little girl. I first saw Cacoyannis’ 1977 film, Iphigenia, when taking a Greek-tragedy-in-translation course at Iowa State in what would now be called my ‘gap year’ in 1986—thanks, David Roochnik and …