Empowering Images

Dr Katharina Lorenz discusses the origins of her interest in mythological imagery through a study of two scenes from the Pergamon altar.

Religious experience and cognitive science

Esther Eidinow updates us on the progress of her AHRC project ‘CAARE’.   As historians, how do we gain insight into the religious experiences of historical subjects? This is the key question behind the project Cognitive Approaches to Ancient Religious Experience, an AHRC-funded network that brings together scholars using cognitive approaches and those working on …

Greek Tragedy on the Small Screen

Lynn Fotheringham previews a series of rarely-seen TV productions of Greek tragedy, which she has organised to be shown in Nottingham next spring. In January-March 2016, CADRE and Lakeside Arts are bringing the BFI mini-season ‘Classics on TV: Greek Tragedy on the Small Screen’ to Nottingham. These rare productions range in date from 1958 to the last production specially …

Comics about Sparta

Lynn Fotheringham talks about how she got interested in Sparta’s depiction in comics – the subject of an event at Lakeside Museum this Saturday.     One Tuesday evening in spring 1998, a friend of mine showed up at the pub with the first issue of a comic telling the story of Thermopylae. If it had been in …

Rome’s Invisible City

4.5 million people tuned into BBC1 on June 1 for ‘Rome’s Invisible City’, a documentary presented by Alexander Armstrong and featuring Mark Bradley explaining the finer points of strigils and hot walnuts. Here Dr Bradley describes his experience of being involved with the programme. It was 6 a.m. on a warm September morning when Alexander …

Women of Troy part 3

Lynn Fotheringham analyses some audience responses from last week’s production of Women of Troy.     In my last post about the New Theatre’s Women of Troy, I mentioned that I was conducting some audience-research via an on-line questionnaire. I am interested in the different ideas of ‘authenticity’ that affect our response to representations of the ancient world, …

Q-Kolleg part 2

Following yesterday’s post on the most recent Q-Kolleg exchange, today Craig Goodere explains how the 2012/13 exchange has now resulted in the publication of a collection of essays by the participants.   Fresh Perspectives on Graeco-Roman Visual Culture (2015; ed. Klose, Bossert & Leveritt) is a brand new collection of papers written, presented and published by …

Comedy 2500

Alan Sommerstein commemorates a very special anniversary. It is exactly 2500 years ago this month that Athens saw its first official production of comic drama, at the Dionysia festival in the month of Elaphebolion (March/April), in the year that they called “the archonship of Telesinus” and we call 486 BC. (That’s 2500 years ago, not 2501 …

The Night Raid

Helen Lovatt considers Caroline Lawrence’s The Night Raid and writing about the classical world for children.     Several people in my Independent Second Year Project group have decided to write for an audience of children. We have been discussing how this can make a difference to your writing in both style and content. For …

Hugh Trevor-Roper and Edward Gibbon

Simon Malloch traces a bridge from his current research on Hugh Trevor-Roper to his teaching on Edward Gibbon’s classical scholarship.   In March 1959 Hugh Trevor-Roper, Regius Professor of Modern History at Oxford, took his wife Xandra, the daughter of Field Marshal Haig, to convalesce in Beaulieu-sur-Mer. From there he wrote a long letter to the …