Hugh Trevor-Roper and Edward Gibbon

Simon Malloch traces a bridge from his current research on Hugh Trevor-Roper to his teaching on Edward Gibbon’s classical scholarship.   In March 1959 Hugh Trevor-Roper, Regius Professor of Modern History at Oxford, took his wife Xandra, the daughter of Field Marshal Haig, to convalesce in Beaulieu-sur-Mer. From there he wrote a long letter to the …

Censorship, gender and power: Fordyce and Catullus 58

Helen Lovatt considers the relationship between bowdlerising a classical text and broader questions of censorship. Issues of free speech are still very much debated: recently the classicist Mary Beard was caught up in a twitter storm about no-platforming speakers at universities, in particular certain radical feminists whose views offend some in the transgender community. It …

Sappho’s Beloved

Doctoral student Harriet Lander introduces a case-study from her work on the history of translations of Sappho.   Solon, according to Aelian, asked his nephew to teach him one of Sappho’s poems, ‘So that I may learn it and then die’. This desire to know and understand Sappho’s lyrics has been a pervasive attitude from antiquity …

Singing the blues

Mark Bradley hunts for the ‘missing’ colours in the ancient world The ancient Greeks and Romans probably would have wondered what the fuss is about. They would have seen a dress that looked slightly different depending on the viewer’s angle. They might have thought it peculiar as fashion – more like a costume for comedy …

Back to the Future

Katharina Lorenz revisits Percy Gardner’s views on Classics, teaching ancient art, and changing the world. “If anything has been proved in the history of education during the last half century, it is that mere technical instruction in detail does not produce the highest efficiency. It is here that many so-called practical men are mistaken. The …