Russians as Spartans? – or Putin the tyrant?

Edmund Stewart on Boris Johnson’s latest allusions to the ancient world In a recent interview with the Times, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson once again looked to the ancient world in an effort to explain modern Russia and its relations with the West. “I was reading Thucydides’ history of the Peloponnesian War. It was obvious …

Languages, Texts and Society: A New PG Journal

Melanie Fitton-Hayward announces a new post-graduate journal based at the University of Nottingham After publishing its first issue in April 2017, LTS editors are busy preparing for the second issue. There’s submissions to sort through, final articles to be edited, book reviews to be collated, peer reviewers to find, and style templates to be applied. …

Enoch Powell and the Classics

Gary Fisher on Herodotus, Enoch Powell, and Metaphors of Arboreal Rebirth ‘In that acropolis [of Athens] is a shrine of Erechtheus, called the “Earthborn,” and in the shrine are an olive tree and a pool of salt water. The story among the Athenians is that they were set there by Poseidon and Athena as tokens when …

What would Plato do? Greek Thought in US Politics

As the 2016 US Presidential election campaign continues to confound forecasters, recent PhD student and Teaching Affiliate John Bloxham discusses classics and American politics. Looking at American politics through the prism of Greek philosophy probably struck a few people as a waste of time when I started my PhD on the reception of Greek thought in …

Long-lived monarchs, ancient and modern

In light of the Queen’s recent 90th birthday, Nicholas Wilshere discusses long-lived monarchs ancient and modern. April 21st marked the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II, an event which prompted royal reporters to make comparisons with other long-lived and long-reigning rulers, and to point out that she is both the longest-lived and longest-reigning British monarch, …

Chorus girls – and boys

Lynn Fotheringham tells us about the creative challenges and opportunities of the Chorus. In the Horrible Histories Groovy Greeks[1] theatre-show, a family of supposedly late-arriving theatre-goers are sucked into the action to learn about ancient Greek culture. They are informed that the Greeks had democracy, the Olympics and theatre: that the actors (all male) wore masks, …

Sappho’s Beloved

Doctoral student Harriet Lander introduces a case-study from her work on the history of translations of Sappho.   Solon, according to Aelian, asked his nephew to teach him one of Sappho’s poems, ‘So that I may learn it and then die’. This desire to know and understand Sappho’s lyrics has been a pervasive attitude from antiquity …

This INSANE post will change your life!

Oliver Thomas goes fishing for your attention with the help of some ancient Greek authors.   I find ‘clickbait’ one of the most annoying features of the internet. When I’m minding my own procrastinatory business on Facebook, suddenly something entitled ‘This INSANE article will change your life’ pops up in my feed, aggressively colonising my attention by …