Enoch Powell and the Classics

Gary Fisher on Herodotus, Enoch Powell, and Metaphors of Arboreal Rebirth ‘In that acropolis [of Athens] is a shrine of Erechtheus, called the “Earthborn,” and in the shrine are an olive tree and a pool of salt water. The story among the Athenians is that they were set there by Poseidon and Athena as tokens when …

November is Greek Myth Month

Lynn Fotheringham catalogues some upcoming Classics-related drama. There’s a remarkable concentration of Greek-mythology related drama coming up in November, both in Nottingham and elsewhere. I’ll start with the cinema before moving on to various theatrical productions. Yorgos Lanthimos’ latest film, The Killing of a Sacred Deer, is a modern take on the story of Agamemnon’s family …

My experiences of the British School at Rome’s Summer School

Undergraduate in Ancient History Ben White writes about his experiences as part of the British School at Rome’s summer school.

“If … you’re a citizen of the world, you’re a citizen of nowhere”

Oliver Thomas discusses Theresa May’s recent speech about citizenship and being a “citizen of the world”. What would Diogenes have made of it all?

Euphronios and EURO 2016

What does the European Football Championship have to do with Greek art? Andreas Kropp has been tuning in…   Britain is Brexiting, Europe is reeling, and we can’t even begin to comprehend what just hit us. So how about this, let’s instead just focus our attention on that other thing gripping the continent these days, …

What would Plato do? Greek Thought in US Politics

As the 2016 US Presidential election campaign continues to confound forecasters, recent PhD student and Teaching Affiliate John Bloxham discusses classics and American politics. Looking at American politics through the prism of Greek philosophy probably struck a few people as a waste of time when I started my PhD on the reception of Greek thought in …

Chorus girls – and boys

Lynn Fotheringham tells us about the creative challenges and opportunities of the Chorus. In the Horrible Histories Groovy Greeks[1] theatre-show, a family of supposedly late-arriving theatre-goers are sucked into the action to learn about ancient Greek culture. They are informed that the Greeks had democracy, the Olympics and theatre: that the actors (all male) wore masks, …

Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk — or should that be Medea?

Helen Lovatt reflects on intertextuality and a trip to the opera (and continues to see Argonauts everywhere). Last week I experienced the theatrical pounding of Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk in a sensational and vivid production by the ENO. Get a flavour of it on youtube here. I do like a text that puts its …

Upcoming Classical drama

As a new semester begins, Lynn Fotheringham has been searching out upcoming theatrical productions with a Classical connection. Contemporary theatre is in the midst of a love affair with Greek tragedy, with both the Almeida Theatre in London (lots of great stuff on their website) and the Classic Stage Company in New York holding festivals this summer. …

The Ancient World is Awesome

Helen Lovatt explores Classical reception and childhood creativity in the Lego Movie. This post contains spoilers. If you haven’t seen the Lego movie, watch it immediately! The Lego Movie (2014) sets creativity in competition with conformity. You can watch the ‘Everything is Awesome’ sequence on Youtube, and it gives a good flavour of the central themes …